apple rosemary pie

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summary: apple rosemary pie recipe, includes pastry made with lard; superpeel is great for lifting pastry; click on image to see larger view

apple rosemary pie When am I going to remember to take photos right away?! This is the last little bit of the most fabulous apple pie.

And if it was so fabulous, why was there still so much left after a couple of days? Because we made TWO apple pies….

We have the most wonderful neighbours. Last weekend, I got a message saying “I have apples. You make great crust. How about: I make filling and crumb topping. You make a double crust. We merge efforts and magically two pies appear!

How can I say no to such an offer?!

Because she’s right. I do make great crust. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that I used to make THE greatest crust. But a while back, T asked me to teach him how to make pastry. And naturally, now HE makes the greatest crust (mine is a close second).

So I informed T that he had to make pastry for two pies and that they would prepare the apples next door. The next morning, armed with pastry, dough scraper and our superpeel, we hopped over the fence and proceeded to have way too much fun constructing pies.

The original plan was to put a crumb topping on both pies. But I neeeeeded to play with my SuperPeel. I was really anxious to try lifting a lattice topping.

Oh my!!! The superpeel really is super. I too was amazed by the lattice piecrust video (superpeel.com video: “Make a Pie! Moving Pastry Made Simple!”) and HAD to try it! I must confess I wasn’t quite as successful as the person on the video but I think it’s because my lattice was rather lacy in comparison. I think the pie looked beautiful (others disagreed, in a mocking but friendly way, saying that looks weren’t everything and that they were sure it would taste alright).

All in all, we had a great time building pies together. And while the pies were finishing baking, we drank coffee and snacked on just baked pastry strips flavoured with cinnamon sugar. Life doesn’t get much better, does it?

Here’s what the two Ts did to make the pie with rosemary:

Apple Rosemary Pie
filling based on epicurious.com’s Apple and Rosemary Tarte

pastry

  • 1 c unbleached all-purpose flour
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ⅓ c lard
  • ICE-COLD water (anywhere from 2 Tbsp to ½ c)

Apple filling

  • 6 apples
  • c sugar
  • 1 Tbsp fresh rosemary leaves
  • 2 Tbsp flour (or thereabouts)
  • 1 tsp salt

preparation

  1. Pastry: Mix the flour and salt together in a bowl. Cut the lard into the flour and salt until it is pea sized. Add ICE-COLD water a little at a time and mix lightly until it is pastry consistency. Use a pastry cutter if your hands are warm or use your hands if you have cold hands like mine. Please note that the amount of water changes drastically, depending on the humidity. (For whatever pastry recipe you use, if it is very humid, reduce the amount of water called for.)
  2. Wrap it tightly in plastic. REFRIGERATE AT LEAST ONE HOUR.
  3. Filling: Put sugar into a bowl.
  4. Wash apples. Peel, core and slice them in wedges. Put each sliced apple into the bowl of sugar and gently swish the slices around to coat with sugar to stop browning.
  5. Chop the rosemary finely and mix it into the apples.
  6. Assemble the pie: Handling the pastry as little as possible, place it on a lightly floured board. Cut it in half. Roll out one half into a large round that will fill a pie plate leaving about an inch hanging over the edge.
  7. Add flour to the apple mixture and stir well. Dump it into the prepared bottom crust.
  8. Once again, handling the pastry as little as possible, roll out the other half to create the top crust. Cut it in strips to create a lattice top to drape it over the apples, trimming to leave about an inch hanging over. Keep the trimmings!! Gently fold the bottom edge over the lattice work and pinch the two crusts together. If the pastry seems dry (it shouldn’t) use water or fruit juice to help to seal it. (Put the trimmings onto a cookie sheet and scatter with sugar and cinnamon. Set aside.)
  9. Bake the pie and pastry strips for about 15 minutes at 425F – until the crust is beginning to turn gold. Then turn the oven down to 350F and continue baking the pie for 20 to 30 minutes more: until the filling is bubbling in centre. At the same time that you turn the oven down, take the pastry strips out of the oven.

Serve hot or cold – as is, or with ice cream. Or sharp cheddar. Or goat’s cheese. Serve the leftovers (if there are any) for breakfast with yoghurt.

Note that the juice might have a tendency to overflow while the pie is baking. Make sure there is a tray on the next rack down to catch the juices. (It’s much easier to clean a tray than to clean the oven.)

Rosemary in apple pie is fantastic!

Which shouldn’t really come as a surprise because apple lavender pie is so delicious. But I think the rosemary has a slight edge over the lavender and I’ll definitely make this pie again!

When I was looking for the epicurious version of the apple rosemary pie, I came across honey apple pie with thyme. If rosemary with apples is good, then thyme must be pretty fantastic as well.

Oh yes, don’t let me forget to say that the other pie we made was a sugar and cinnamon version with a crumb topping. It too was delicious! (Sorry no photographic evidence. We were very busy licking our plates clean.)

Hmmm, is it time to make pies again?

 

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  • maybelles mom

    I love herbs in pie, and I think your lattice turned out fine. Last year I made many and everyone looked nicer than the last.

  • MrsBrown

    Mmm, pie. I love pie. Pie and savoury herbs, hmmmm. I think the neighbour’s plum tree has too many plums for him to eat. Which herb would go with plums?

    Plum pie!!! I adore plum pie. And …hmmm, good question, MrsBrown. Maybe lemon thyme?? Or what about tarragon? ...googling... Aha!! Look, these look promising:plum and blackberry crumble with tarragon; Plum Ravioli with Lemon-Thyme Honey and Yogurt; lemon thyme drizzle cake with plum compote. -Elizabeth (I must say that I love the sound of something called “drizzle cake”!

  • Rosemary apple; honey apple thyme; clearly I need to try some pie! … but you say it’s all gone? Clearly yes, it’s time for you to make more pie please.

    edit 4 August 2009: So? Have you made apple pie yet? Which herb did you use? Thyme or rosemary? -ejm

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