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Sunday, 25 August 2013

Are We Nuts?? Why Yes! We’re Making Coffee Cake (BBB August 2013)

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BBB: Let's Get Baking summary: recipe for Yeasted Nut Roll Coffee Cake, a no-knead yeasted dough mixed the night before, assembled the next day and baked in a tube pan; a Bread Baking Babes project; submission for YeastSpotting and BYOB; (click on images to see larger views and more photos)

Bread Baking Babes (BBB) August 2013

Yeasted Coffee Cake

There is no bread? Let them eat cake.

Hey!! Wait a minute!! I thought we were Bread Baking Babes!

This month, Jamie (Life’s a Feast) chose this month’s BBBabes’ project. It looks an awful lot like cake but it is yeasted. And it is really really really really delicious.

Here I am, only 9 days late with my post. But. Better late than never. Especially in this case!

I’m wondering if this month’s BBB bread is what Marie Antoinette had in mind when she said to let them eat cake… (I know!! It wasn’t Marie Antoinette who said this! But some misguided ninny probably did).

BBB Nut Roll Coffee Cake diary:

29 July 2013, 15:28 I was going to start this today. So I checked the ingredients list just before we headed out to the grocery store:

Yeast (14gm? Whoa! that’s a lot) check
Unsalted butter check
2% milk check
eggs check
sugar check
salt check
all-purpose flour check
ground walnuts/pecans nope nope
cinnamon check
Tube pan: nope (but I KNOW my neighbour has at least one. She has EVERYTHING.)

I innocently asked T if we should get walnuts or pecans for the next BBBabe bread. (Have I ever mentioned that I DON’T wear The Pants? or The Trousers, if you are using British English?)

he: you just made BBBabe bread! Why are you making more now? We’re just about to go away!
me: I was going to make it now and post-date it. I’ll use the last of the eggs in the fridge.
he: Those eggs are pretty old. I don’t think they’ll work very well. And if they do, how are we going to eat all that bread?
me: I’ll make half the recipe.

And I began to check the eggs by using the Joy of Cooking method of putting them into a bowl of cold water; any that float are rejected.

ALL of them floated. Every single one. They all went down the drain, chased by cold water, baking soda, vinegar (because two of the eggs were REALLY funky). We now have zero eggs in the house. It has been decreed that we are NOT getting more eggs before we leave. We are NOT having Nut Roll – even if it’s just half a recipe – before we go.

I pick my battles. Maybe I’ll make the Nut Roll with my sister out west. If she has a tube pan. At any rate, I’m so sorry, Jamie. My post will be late.

2 August 2013 12:35 I emailed my sister if she thought it would be a good idea for us to make this recipe together when I’m at her house in a few days. She wrote back:

Sure! I don’t have a French whisk or a copper but I do have a hand blender with a whisk attachment. Pecans yes, walnuts no (bleah bleah – make my mouth burn)
 
-my sister, email reply

Yay!! I’m so glad she chose pecans over walnuts. I like walnuts, but I LOVE pecans. I think I will take our copper bowl and French whisk with me so she can be amazed at how easy it is to use.

Oops! I forgot to ask her if she has a tube pan. We may well be re-constructing Tanna’s ingenious version (even though the cake can probably be made without the hole). The great thing is that my sister is a kindergarten teacher so she has lots of experience with making things out of tubes and foil. :-)

14 August 2013 07:10
I quit complaining, pulled on my big girl pants, drank a bottle of wine and rolled up my sleeves for Coffee Cake #3 and…. third time seems the charm.
 
-Jamie, BBB forum

15 August 2013 11:47
I’m so glad to hear from Elle that the recipe halves well! It’s looking more and more like I will be baking this when I get home. My sister is getting cold feet. Not to mention that I am challenged about exactly how long it takes to travel from place to place in this neck of the woods…. We’re ferrying from Vancouver Island to the mainland today and won’t be getting to my sister’s house until very late tonight, celebrating our mother’s birthday tomorrow and then leaving early Saturday.

My sister and I had a choice – we could spend the extra time between birthday feasting by playing boardgames that nobody else will play with us or we could tackle Jamie’s coffee cake and hope that it will be ready in time to eat before we leave on Saturday.

My sister said that when I told her about Jamie’s third time of making the cake, she couldn’t stop thinking “Third Time!?” She decreed that the cake was too hard and that if we chose to make cake rather than play boardgames, she would simply watch me make it.

18 August 2013, 23:01
You will need a stand mixer or beaters to whip egg whites for the meringue filling
 
-Jamie, BBB August 2013 recipe

Stand mixer? Pffft! I don’ need no stinkin’ stand mixer! I’ve got lots of wooden spoons. And elbow grease galore. :-)

22 August 2013, 23:01 Well! That was awfully easy. The hardest parts about it were finding the ingredients, measuring and dividing the eggs. Oh, yes, and mixing in the butter. I’ll get back to that…

I have a confession to make. I’ve never actually successfully divided eggs before. I have always wiggled out of it. So there I was in the kitchen a few minutes ago, feeling helpless. T was watching and I asked him if he wanted to separate the eggs. Not really. I stood there with an egg grasped in my hand and began to hyperventilate. T asked if I really wanted him to separate the eggs. I hesitated and then bravely whimpered that I’d do it. And cracked open the first egg.

It opened brilliantly. The white drained out and the little orb of yolk lay in my hand beautifully. I plopped it into the mixing bowl. And thrilled at my success, cracked open the second egg.

Wahhhhhhh!! The shell didn’t crack nicely at all. I held the egg carefully over a DIFFERENT bowl just in case the yolk broke and painstakingly picked bits of shell away until there was a hole large enough to drain out the white without damaging the yolk. I tried not to be aware of T standing there staring at me in silent judgement. Just as I had finished delicately draining the white into the bowl while holding the yellow orb in my hand, I saw that there was a bit of shell attached to it. Am I an idiot? (I’ll answer that for you. Why yes! I am!)

With my hand still over the eggwhite bowl, I started to pick at the shell to get it off the egg yolk. Suddenly, T’s silence was broken: “Be careful; you’re going to break the yolk!!”

And of course, that’s exactly what happened. Luckily, my hand had moved away from the egg white bowl and no yolk escaped into it. I hope. I tossed the egg yolk onto the butter in the mixing bowl.

The butter. Jamie said I was supposed to melt the butter. I know everything so I knew that I didn’t have to melt the butter! All I had to do was boil the water and pour that over the butter to melt it.

Did I say that I know everything?

Allow me to clarify. I know ALMOST everything. I have a little trouble with volumes. It turns out that 63 gms of boiling water isn’t nearly enough to make much of a dent in 113 gms of cold rock-hard out of the fridge butter – even if it’s cubed first. What I ended up with was sludgy mess of softish butter chunks.

I decided to use the potato masher to soften the butter. Oh yes. THAT’S a good idea. All the butter firmly attached itself to the potato masher. No amount of shaking and scraping with the flat of a knife would release the butter from the masher.

But that’s what fingers are for, right? And butter is very good for the skin, isn’t it?

At last I was ready to actually mix. I fetched the wooden spoon and began to beat. It got smooth quite quickly. I beat it a little longer to account for hand beating instead of stand mixering.

And then into the fridge it went. See, P? THAT wasn’t complicated at all!

23 August 2013, 08:39 Ack! I KNEW that I should have left the bowl on the counter overnight! I just took the dough (batter??) out of the fridge. It hasn’t budged. Was it supposed to rise in the fridge? Surely it was!

Clearly, my sister and I made the right decision to play games instead of making Jamie’s cake…. Here’s hoping that the dough will rise at room temperature.

11:39 It. Hasn’t. Even. Budged.   Phooey!

12:14 Okay, it looks like maybe there’s some movement. Perhaps not all is lost.

18:45dishes Well!! THAT was labour intensive! I started the process of shaping at around 17:00. And didn’t finish shaping until an hour later and then it took me until now to wash all the dishes.

Of course, it didn’t have to be so difficult. It’s because I had to switch grinders for the pecans. And it it Not to mention that I didn’t do this morning’s breakfast dishes because I thought I’d do them at the same time as I did the baking dishes. And I used a LOT of bowls. And spoons. More than necessary.

But let’s play the Glad Game. I’m GLAD I went crazy and used every bowl and spoon in the house. Now all our dishes are clean!

While I was ransacking the cupboards our small spring form pan and small steel cup to use as a faux tube pan, I came across a pudding container that I rescued from Mum’s kitchen when we were clearing out our parents’ house a couple of summers ago. Wow! It looks perfect!

I then began to pre-measure all the filling ingredients. Have you ever tried spooning out just some egg whites into a bowl? Ha! I painstakingly spooned out about 3 grams at a time until I had roughly 15 grams in the bowl. And then, knowing I had 22 grams to go (I was making half the recipe), I whooshed all the egg whites in thinking maybe the eggs were on the small side.

soft peak egg whites Sigh. Suddenly, the scale said 56 grams. I began to spoon out a gram at a time. Sometimes I managed to spoon out 2 grams. Several times I spooned out zero grams. Then I realized that if I used TWO spoons, I could arrest the whites from oozing out of the spoon and back into the bowl. And at last, I had 37 grams of whites on the scale.

The next part went unexpectedly breezily. Making the meringue was dead easy and took no time at all. And I was hand beating the whites!

dishes Buttering the pan was insanely simple and very satisfying. Did I use a little too much butter? Maybe. On the other hand, can there be too much butter?

Rolling out the light and airy dough was also very easy. So was spreading it with the meringue mixture.

Rolling it into tight jelly rolls was less than simple. Hahahahahahahahaha WHAT am I saying?? It was just barely possible to get the floppy stuff rolled. Tightly?? I don’t think so.

And then maneuvring the rolls into the buttered baking dish was Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha – well, let’s call a spade a spade. It was a nightmare. But at last, it was done. I brushed the top with a little milk and went to find the slivered almonds.

I was CERTAIN we had slivered almonds!

dishes When my thick head finally grasped that there were no slivered almonds nearby, I grabbed some pepitas. I hope they work.

I’m going down to turn on the oven and will be baking the cake soon. Wish me luck.

(I’m secretly hoping that we’ll hate the cake so I won’t feel compelled to make it again. :lalala:)

dishes 23:09 I left it for ages on the counter until it finally doubled. At last it is baked. I think. Then after it was baked (it took almost an hour) I obediently left it in the pan for 10 minutes to cool and then overturned it onto a plate. It popped right out.

Here’s a big surprise. The pepitas are on the bottom…. Duhhh! Next time, maybe I’ll line the sides of the dish with pepitas so they are on the sides of the cake.

It smells wonderful although it looks a little blonde.

Tomorrow, we’ll stick it back in the oven to give it a golden tinge all over.

dishes We put a gauze umbrella overtop and left the coffee cake to finish cooling on the counter. The next morning, we agreed that it was just a little too light coloured.

After toaster-ovening it at a lowish heat for about 15 minutes, we each had a wedge with slices of cheddar cheese (one of us added more butter!) and big bowls of cafe au lait for breakfast on the front porch this morning. It was fabulous! It was so fabulous that we each had another wedge. It’s no surprise that the cake was just as fabulous.

Here is Jamie’s BBB August 2013: Cinnamon Nut Roll Coffee Cake recipe. And here is what I did to it:

Yeasted Cinnamon Nut Roll Coffee Cake
adapted from a recipe in “Taste of Home cookbook (Taste of Home Bakeshop Favorites)”

To do this by hand, it’s nice to have a copper bowl and French whisk whip egg whites for the meringue filling and a 6 inch tube pan for making Christmas pudding.

Dough (Day Before Baking)

  • 7 gm (2.25tsp) active dry yeast
  • 32gm (2 Tbsp) warm water (100F) ¹
  • 113 gm (0.5 c) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 63 gm (4 Tbsp) boiling water ²
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 4 tsp powdered skim milk
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 3 gm (3/8 tsp) salt
  • 170 gm (1 c + 5 Tbsp) unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 5 gm (2 tsp) 100% whole wheat flour ³

Filling (Day of Baking)

  • 38 gm (2.5 Tbsp) egg whites 4
  • 67 gm (0.5 c) sugar
  • 63 gm (0.5 c) pecan halves, ground finely 5
  • 15 gm (1.5 Tbsp) additional sugar
  • 0.5-1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 Tbsp milk
  1. Mixing In the evening of the day before you will be baking the coffee cake, pour the 100F water into a small bowl. (why 100F??) Whisk in yeast until it has dissolved. Set aside.
  2. Put the butter into a large mixing bowl, making sure that it is cut into quite small pieces. Pour in boiling water and stir to melt the butter. Using a wooden spoon, stir in powdered milk and sugar.
  3. Divide the eggs one at a time, taking care not to break the yolks. Put the yolks into the butter mixture. Reserve the whites in a small bowl, cover and refrigerate.
  4. Add flour and salt and beat well until the mixture is smooth and all the flour is incorporated. Don’t worry if it’s sticky.
  5. Kneading and proofing There is NO need to knead. This is a no-knead bread! Jump directly to the proofing. If your kitchen is cool, cover and set aside in a draft free area overnight on the counter. If your kitchen is hot, refrigerate overnight.
  6. Filling On the day of baking, use a French whisk to beat the egg whites in a very clean bowl (copper if you have it)until it forms soft peaks. Gradually beat in 67 gm (half cup) sugar, about 2 tablespoons at a time until the sugar is dissolved and the mixture is shiny.
  7. In another bowl, stir together the nuts, milk, cinnamon and remaining sugar. Gently fold in the meringue. Set aside.
  8. Shaping Butter a 6-inch tube pan.
  9. Turn the dough out onto a well floured board and divide it in half. Roll each piece into largish rectangle that is about a quarter inch thick. Spread half of the filling evenly over each rectangle leaving a small amount around the edges empty. Roll each rectangle in a tight jelly-roll, starting on the long side. Pinch the seams.
  10. Put one filled roll seam side up into the buttered tube pan. Put the second roll seam side down. Brush gently with milk and scatter on a few pepitas if you want. Cover with a plate and allow to rise to double.
  11. Baking Preheat the oven to 350F (180C). Bake the cake on the middle shelf of the preheated oven for 40 – 45 minutes or until puffed and golden brown. Turn the cake around after about 25 minutes of baking, to account for uneven oven heat. Remove the finished cake from the oven and allow to cool for 10 minutes before inverting the pan and removing the coffee cake to a cooling rack to cool completely before slicing into it. (It’s still baking inside!) 6

Notes:

1.) Warm water: Please do not use water from the hot water tap. (Read more here) Instead, heat the water in a kettle or microwave. To create lukewarm water, add cold water until it is the correct temperature of 100F (38C). (If you are allergic to using a thermometer, you can do the baby bottle test on the back of your wrist.) Please note that before the yeast is added, the water temperature must be BELOW 120F (49C) because yeast begins to die when the temperature is higher than 120F.

2.) Boiling Water and Powdered Milk: The BBB recipe calls for warm milk. If you don’t have powdered milk, make sure that your butter is very soft; you don’t want to be boiling milk – it might curdle.

3.) Flours The BBB recipe calls for all purpose flour only. I have a horror of using only white flour and like to add just a trace of 100% whole wheat flour to give a slightly nuttier flavour.

4.) Egg Whites: It’s not easy to spoon out egg whites. Two spoons help. Alternatively, you could freeze the egg whites and chop off the required amount and thaw it. (I think. I’ve actually never used frozen egg whites.)

5.) Pecans The BBB recipe actually calls for walnuts. Pecans are great but I suspect that ground almonds or hazelnuts would work just as well.

6.) But I LIKE warm bread just out of the oven!! N.B. Of course you may want to serve warm coffee cake. Reheat the cake after it has cooled completely. (It is still baking when it first comes out of the oven!) To reheat any UNsliced bread, turn the oven to 400F for 5 minutes or so. Turn the oven OFF. Put the bread in the hot oven for ten minutes.

BBB Coffee Cake As we sat on the front porch savouring breakfast, our neighbours heard us exclaiming and then they had some too and agreed that it was wonderful. There’s hardly any coffee cake left now… remind me to make the full recipe next time.

Thank you, Jamie! What a great cake this is (was)!

While it’s true that for this first time round of making Jamie’s coffee cake was somewhat time consuming and seemingly complicated, it really didn’t have to be. In fact, with a tiny bit of planning ahead, it’s dead easy to make.

Indeed, it’s WAY easier to make than I thought it was going to be.

It looks way too complicated! If you decide to make it, I’ll just watch.

-my sister, her house

Note that this comes from the sister who had just proudly showed off the delicious macarons she made – for the first time ever, as well as a perfectly formed no-knead rustic loaf that was cooling on a rack.

So, if you’re thinking this sounds too complicated, please think again. If you can separate eggs, you can easily make this coffee cake.

Bread Baking Babes

Jamie (Life’s a Feast) is the host of August 2013′s Bread Baking Babes’ task. She wrote:

[H]ere is the recipe I have chosen [...] from a Taste of Home cookbook (Taste of Home Bakeshop Favorites) and every recipe I have tried from one of their many cookbooks has worked a charm. I know they have a pretty heavy-duty test kitchen, thank heavens. I have been ogling this recipe for months and so I decided that we will made something sweet and cinnamony – a great treat for breakfast, brunch and snack. Or lunch, in a pinch. Note that the dough rests in the refrigerator over night, so start the process the day before!

We know that you too will WANT to make this coffee cake!! To receive a Baking Buddy Badge to display on your site: bake the coffee cake by the end of August and post about it (we love to see how your bread turns out AND hear what you think about it – what you didn’t like and/or what you liked) before the 27 August 2013. If you do not have a blog, no problem; you can also post your picture(s) to Flickr (or any other photo sharing site) and record your thoughts about the bread there. Please remember to email the Kitchen of the Month to say that your post is up.

For complete details about this month’s recipe, the BBB and how to become a BBBuddy, please read:

Please take a look at the other BBBabes’ August bread:

YeastSpotting
Yeastspotting - every Friday (wordle.net image)

Each week, Susan (Wild Yeast) compiles a list of many bread-specific recipes from across the web. For complete details on how to be included in the YeastSpotting round up, please read the following:

Bake Your Own Bread (BYOB)
BYOB is a monthly event that was hosted by Heather (girlichef) and has now been taken over by Carola (Sweet and That’s It). Heather wrote:

[BYOB] encourages you to start (or continue) getting comfortable baking bread in your own kitchen. Anything from simple quick breads to conquering that fear of yeast to making and nurturing your own sourdough starter. All levels of bakers are welcome to participate.

And Carola, changing the name to “Bake Your Own Bread – Il Cestino del Pane” wrote:

Homemade bread is healthy! As healthy as you decide: choose the best ingredients (if you can afford it, organic and GMO free) and you’ll be surrounded by the most delicious scent and fascinated by the most delicious taste.

Let the adventure continue!

Sweet and That's it - BYOB For more information about BYOB, please read the following:

 

Yeasted Nut Roll Coffee Cake (BBB August 2013)
 

  1. Comment by Kelly — 25 August 2013 @ 14:40 EDT

    I’ve told you that I love reading your BBB diaries, yes? Because you could probably put them all together and publish them as a bread making saga or epic compilation. Comedy, drama, perseverance… it’s got it all. ;)

    Thank you, Kelly! “Comedy, drama, perseverance” Hahahaha! you should have seen what I left out! -Elizabeth

  2. Comment by Ckay — 25 August 2013 @ 15:27 EDT

    Ooooh Elizabeth,
    I still have tears in my eyes….from the great laugh I had while reading your post. I feel so sorry for what you went through but it was impossible not to laugh at your story…at the way you wrote it.
    You and Jamie won the “August toughness award” for making this cake despite having the “Baking Gods” agains you :-)
    So glad it turned out beautiful and delicious.

    I’m so glad it made you laugh, C. And yes, we were very glad that it turned out so well too. -E

  3. Comment by barbara — 25 August 2013 @ 19:17 EDT

    I agree with Kelly – you could publish these.

    The cake looks fab. I bet it was better with pepitas than almonds.

    I can just see an editor blanching at all those words! Imagine how many volumes just two or three accounts would be. As for the pepitas vs slivered almonds, I think you may be right, Barbara; the pepitas were a brilliant addition. -Elizabeth

  4. Comment by Patricia — 25 August 2013 @ 20:40 EDT

    Aug 15;

    She decreed that the cake was too hard and that if we chose to make cake rather than play boardgames, she would simply watch me make it.

    Wait a second! That’s not how I remember it at all. There was no decreeing! I was happy to participate in making cake even if it looked way too hard AND I’m a dab hand at separating eggs.

    It looks way too complicated! If you decide to make it, I’ll just watch.

    -my sister, her house

    I have NO recollection of saying that, none at all.

    Just to clarify, I SHOULD mash the butter with the potato masher? HAHAHAHAHA

    Yes. That’s what you should do. :-D Because I believe you keep your butter in the freezer.-Elizabeth (you did say it. it’s in my diary so you must have)

  5. Comment by Your non-baking sister — 26 August 2013 @ 00:03 EDT

    Well. This is a cautionary tale. A hilarious cautionary tale, mind you. It’s a caution to me never to try baking. I would like to eat the coffee cake.

    Never try baking? But it’s dead easy, C! Why, it’s no-knead. :-) -E

  6. Comment by Jamie — 26 August 2013 @ 04:54 EDT

    Well, it looks like either you are trying to outdo me in crazy insane baking mishaps or you took my own blog post too literally! But happily your cake came out fabulously!!! So perfect! It does seem that this recipe is so very forgiving! I love the shape and must start baking my coffee cakes in fluted pans. Well, as we say (and a rule I often live by) better late than never and I am thrilled you baked with me this month! Perfect coffee cake!

    No no, Jamie! You still win. I only made the cake once as opposed to your three times. And I was very pleased with the shape too, although I couldn’t help thinking that your beautiful smooth round coffee cake liberally dusted with toasted slivered almonds wasn’t even more beautiful.
     
    But I think ours may well have tasted as good as yours. I can’t imagine it being better… many thanks again for a perfectly lovely breakfast. -Elizabeth

  7. Comment by Patricia — 26 August 2013 @ 10:47 EDT

    Perhaps I’ll make this at Thanksgiving and then the non-baking sister can eat it. Then again, I might just make baking powder cinnamon buns which are slightly easier.

    Don’t let my overly verbose diary fool you, Patricia. This coffee cake is pretty ridiculously easy to make. And I suspect that if it is mixed the night before and left on the counter to proof rather than in the fridge, and put it in the oven for an hour to rise to double with only the light on after it was shaped the next morning. You could easily be baking for a leisurely breakfast to be served around 10am. Unless you get up ridiculously early and then you could serve it at 9am…. -Elizabeth

  8. Comment by Lien — 26 August 2013 @ 15:41 EDT

    You turned out a spendid bread. Of course you can eat it warm, we love to live dangerously every now and then!

    Thank you, Lien! Yes, living dangerously is awfully fun, isn’t it? -Elizabeth

  9. Comment by Katie — 28 August 2013 @ 03:07 EDT

    Sorry it took so long… I was /am not getting comment notices…. I hate computers. But I love your cake – and your story LOL
    You’ve been added.

    Thank you, Katie! But it is I who should be saying “sorry it took so long” – I was the one who was so late. -Elizabeth

  10. Pingback by Bread Baking Babes, Cinnamon Nut Roll Coffee Cale — 28 August 2013 @ 03:09 EDT

    Cinnamon, sugar and nuts. Bake it in a coffee cake, slice and eat warm. [...] Elizabeth’s Nut Roll Coffee Cake [...]

  11. Comment by MyKitchenInHalfCups — 30 August 2013 @ 12:38 EDT

    Have I ever told you, you are just FUN! Late, early, difficult … some times it looks so much harder than the actual experience … really that’s every experience I’ve had. LOVE the fancy mold and pepitas! just brilliant … umm that probably means this could be transformed into a savory …. ahhhhh that could be pretty interesting …

    Who me? difficult?? NEVER!! hahahahhaa :-) Hmmm, “transformed into a savory”… now there’s an interesting idea. You’re brilliant, Tanna! -Elizabeth

  12. Comment by Baking Soda — 1 September 2013 @ 03:24 EDT

    Goes to show you should never attempt to make any recipe which states the use of half an egg. If there was ever a need for half eggs they would have invented chickens that would lay half eggs. Which probably would be half chickens. Which is a great thing for small households. Hmmm. Now that’s a niche!
    I also think non baking sisters exist by the presence of baking sisters. I have one!
    And yes, great cake and a fun write!

    Good point, Karen! I’m feeling quite guilty now for suggesting to use half an egg. It might encourage the GM freaks to start experimentation to create half chickens! And yes. Non baking sisters do exist by the presence of baking sisters. I was a non baking sister for years until I moved to a different city and was forced (heh… what hunger will do) to turn into a baking sister. -Elizabeth

  13. Comment by Ckay — 10 September 2013 @ 02:36 EDT

    Thank you so much for submitting your delicious bread, Elizabeth.
    I’ve included your picture and linkup in the “Bake your own Bread – Il Cestino del Pane Roundup”.
    Many thanks and all the best
    xx

    Thank you, C! That’s very kind of you to add my late entry. -E

 

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