artichokes and…

A few days before Easter, T went to buy potatoes and noticed that artichokes were seven for $2.00 at our vegetable store. Sure they were smallish artichokes. But they were beautiful and closed (but not too closed) . Even though there was quite a long line of people behind him, the young Asian girl at the checkout counter asked him how he was going to prepare them. He replied, “steamed whole then we’ll pull the leaves off and dip them in Hollandaise sauce”. And from somewhere in the back of the line, an awed voice murmured Hollandaise… whoa!

So that night for dinner, we had seven artichokes along with a cereal bowl of the best Hollandaise sauce that T has ever made (using his new whisk that he got for Christmas). We also had fried porkchops – pan deglazed with a bit of marsala, baked potato and sauteed mushrooms. Wine: Spanish Penascal Tempranillo 2001. What a dinner!!

Needless to say, 3½ artichokes and half a cereal bowl of Hollandaise, along with all the rest, is a little too many artichokes for me to consume in one sitting (not too much Hollandaise though…). Which meant there were some artichoke hearts left over for Easter Dinner appetizers. Those artichoke hearts with blue cheese dip were so good that we went out and got some more artichokes the next day to have them that way again during the week.

And if some is good, then more must be better! So yesterday, we got seven MORE artichokes to start tonight’s dinner of claypot chicken and rice with stirfried pea greens. Our plan is to eat all the outer leaves with blue cheese dip and leave the hearts for tomorrow or the next day. Those hearts will go onto a pizza.

It’s a good thing for me that there are so many good dinners to distract me from the fact that it’s snowing AGAIN (!?! make it stop!)

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  • First off…it’s snowing again??? Where are you blogging from? Gosh, I spied that word right away and actually shivered! Brrrrrr…

    Thanks for stopping by and oops, sorry that I didn’t actually post about my April Fool’s shenanigans. I think that would have been overdoing it a little by telling the world what I nonsense I was up to. ;-)

    Regarding your comment on Ferrara…I’m glad my posting brought back such wonderful memories of your trip there. Milan to Rome??? AWESOME! Seeing that I figured immediately that you folks were professional cyclists as the mere thought of wheeling it at such distances astounds me. I hope that someday soon, you’ll be able to relieve that experience all over again.

    Now for your post (and I apologize beforehand for going on and on here). I LOVE artichokes and reading about it only served to remind me of the artichokes I made a couple of nites ago. I stuffed them with a breadcrumb-herb mixture and baked them in a small amount of wine/broth. Pretty good stuff, but the oddest thing was that when I was cleaning them, they had no inner choke! And the instructions definitely did say to clean out the choke. Any thoughts on that? I’ve never come across choke-less varieties before, but oh!, how easy they are to work with!

    With all that said, I wish you a good day and happy cooking and eating!

  • ejm

    We noticed that there was no inner choke on these smaller artichokes too, Rowena! I would have said that there has been some genetic modification going on except that on one of the artichokes we had, there was a choke. The artichoke in question was a little larger. Maybe younger artichokes don’t have chokes??

    It’s not hard to ride that distance if you only ride 40 or 50 km a day. That’s the great thing about Italy too. THere are plenty of towns to stop in if you get tired. (I didn’t do that particular Italian ride but I have cycle toured in France. It’s really fun and not hard at all.)

    Thanks for dropping by, Rowena!

    (I’m happy to report that all the snow has melted now and we are starting to seeing crocusses.)