image

bagel making and Rose Levy Beranbaum’s instructions

summary: review of bagel recipe in “The Bread Bible” by Rose Levy Beranbaum; rambling on about nothing much of anything; (no photos yet)

I just pulled pretty good looking bagels out of the oven. (photos still in the camera)

I know. I’ve made bagels before. And even though we really liked our bagels, this time, I thought I’d try out Rose Levy Beranbaum’s bagels, in spite of the fact that the recipe goes over several pages. Whenever instructions go over one page, I’m afraid I don’t read them very well. And this recipe is FULL of instructions. Eeeeeeek!!!

First there are sponge ingredients listed for the full recipe and for half a recipe. (I decided to make the full recipe.) And was quite nervous that I’d suddenly switch to looking at the wrong box. Eeeeeeek!!!!

And of course, because I’m such an expert, I don’t really need to look at the instructions (cough). I started getting stuck here. The sections marked “[lalalala]” are where my eyes read the words but what’s left of my mind wandered away:

Make the sponge. [lalalalalalala] Whisk about 2 minutes, until very smooth; scrape down the sides. The sponge will be very thick. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap.

– Rose Levy Beranbaum, “Levy’s Bagels”, The Bread Bible, pp 152-161

Sponge made and covered. No problem. I read on… or rather, my eyes read on to the flour mixture ingredients listed for the full recipe and for half a recipe. (I remembered to make the full recipe.) And was still quite nervous that I’d suddenly switch to looking at the wrong box. Eeeeeeek!!!!!!

Combine and add the ingredients for the flour mixture. In a medium bowl, whisk together [lalalalalalala] Sprinkle lightly over the sponge; do not stir. Cover with plastic [lalalalalala] 1 hour at room temperature and then refrigerated overnight, or up to 24 hours. (During this time, the sponge will bubble through the flour mixture in places; this is fine.)

– Rose Levy Beranbaum, “Levy’s Bagels”, The Bread Bible, pp 152-161

I whisked together all the dry ingredients and then stared at the sponge instructions again: The sponge will be very thick. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap. And at the next step again: Sprinkle lightly over the sponge; do not stir.

Why would I want to stir dry ingredients that were sprinkled on top of plastic? (Yes, it’s true; sometimes I am very literal. :lalala:)

Obviously, I came to my senses (well not really, but let’s pretend for a minute, shall we?) and after removing the plastic wrap from the sponge, carefully dumped the dry ingredients onto the sponge and covered it again.

And then I noticed that I wasn’t supposed to put all the flour on top. I was supposed to hold some back. (Oh oh.)

Happily, this morning’s kneading session went well and it wasn’t a bad thing that I had not followed the instructions about holding back some of the flour. (Whoosh, that was lucky.)

Fast forward to this afternoon when it came time to shape, boil and bake the bagels.

Shape the dough and let it rise. […] Transfer the dough to an unfloured counter. Cut it in half and place one piece, covered in the refrigerator.

– Rose Levy Beranbaum, “Levy’s Bagels”, The Bread Bible, pp 152-161

What am I supposed to do with the dough in the refrigerator?! I read on to the end of the recipe (okay, okay, I skimmed to the end of the recipe) and there is no instruction about what to do with this second half piece of dough in the fridge.

Cook it tomorrow? Add it to other dough? Forget about it for a week or two and throw it out in the green bin?? Eeeeekkkk!!!!!!

I know. I could ask at Rose Levy Beranbaum’s website. But then I would feel compelled to wait for the answer before going ahead and making the bagels. And we wanted bagels tomorrow morning.

So I just went ahead. I didn’t bother putting any dough in the fridge. I just shaped it all. And I made 12 bagels instead of 10. I hope the Rose won’t be shaking her head and clucking her tongue, wondering why she has to bother spelling EVERYTHING out for people like me.

We’re planning to have bagels for breakfast tomorrow. With cream cheese and apricot preserves. I’ll let you know how it all tastes. I’m pretty sure it will be a rave review. In a good way. :-)

Now excuse me while I go to make the apricot preserves with the cute little apricots we bought at the market yesterday.

 

other posts about Beranbaum’s Bread Bible:

other posts about bagels:

This entry was posted in baking, bread - yeasted & unyeasted, cookbooks, etc., food & drink, whine on by .

* Thank you for visiting. Even though I may not get a chance to reply to you directly, I love seeing your comments and/or questions and read each and every one of them. Please note that your e-mail address will never be displayed by me. Also note that you do NOT have to sign in to Disqus to comment. Click in the "name" box and look for "I'd rather post as a guest" that appears at the bottom of the "Sign up with Disqus". After checking the box, you will be able to proceed with your comment.

"Comment Moderation" is in use. It may take a little time before your comment appears. Comments containing unsolicited advertising will be deleted as spam (which means any subsequent comments will be automatically relegated to the spam section and unlikely to be retrieved). Disqus comment area  wp-image-2332

  • Haha.. so that is what my mind does when I hear the lalala sound in my head while reading recipes… Thanks!