green chilli omelette for the colour blind

summary: green chili omelette revisited; archives; shopping photos; how much editing is too much editing? (click on image to see larger views and more photos)

omelette Hmmm, can we really call this a green chili omelette? These red chilis tasted fruity and sweet, in spite of being firy hot. The omelette was wonderful of course.

But I have to say that I think I like it just a little better when it’s made with green chillis.

It’s such a simple thing too: just onions, green chilies and coriander leaf. Oh yes, and salt and pepper. The omelette is best with flat bread but any toast-like object will do.

I’ve mentioned before, ad nauseum, that I first tried this omelette in a cafe in Calcutta and couldn’t believe how fabulous it was. I also couldn’t believe that I was eating so many hot chilies. I still can’t believe that I want so many hot chilies in an omelette.

Because I’m pretty much of a wuss when chilies are concerned. At least in comparison to the resident fire eater. We were talking recently about green chili omelettes and noting that they are ideal for introducing people to eating hot chilies.

I urge you to try it even if you are afraid. Use just one chilli the first time, but buy lots of green chillies. You’re going to want more. They’re addictive….

I was going through my archives to find the post with the photo of the green chili omelette and see that I have featured green chili omelette twice for the wonderful event EoMEoTE. Ah, EoMEoTE!! I long for the good old days.

No. Wait. Jeanne was talking about expecting participants to accompany each EoMEoTE post with a new chapter for Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales – in Old English, of course! I’ve changed my mind. I’m GLAD that EoMEoTE is on permanent hiatus. :stomp:

But I’m just as glad that my ovoliterary efforts are still available for view in all their glory. Those gems (cough) alone should be answer enough for Katie, who recently wrote the following:

My question is: What to do with the old posts? Re-post with new photos and let the old posts slowly disappear? And/or delete the old ones?

– Katie, Thyme For Cooking: Do old posts ever die?

Personally, I like the idea of leaving the archives alone and revisiting posts. It’s nice to see the progression. Or lack thereof. (Heh. Glancing through my archives, I see that my photos haven’t changed much and I’ve just become more verbose. Clearly I require an editor. :stomp:)

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with editing an old post but I do think it’s nice to know that it’s an edit with a note saying when the edit was made. That’s what I try to do.

And speaking of editing…

We have never taken a photo of a green chili omelette with naan. Even though we had green chili omelettes with naan on numerous occasions. So I played fast and loose and shopped together two photos:

naan
Rogan Josh (& Naan)
March 2008
+ omelette
Green Chili Omelette
April 2006
= green eggs and naan
for September 2005’s
Green Eggs and Naan

Posts about green chili omelettes

As I was wandering through my photo archives with folders that are filled with horrible shots, many of which are out of focus, it got me thinking about this archiving thing further…

A while back I heard a photographer talking on the radio about how digital photography has changed the way people archive. He talked about going through his archives from when he first started taking photos 20 or so years ago. He went through his “reject” folder – photos that he had rejected as a young man but kept because of course, everything was on a roll of negatives. Looking at these same photos today, he said he saw a number of really interesting shots that he rescued from the reject folder AND some of the ones that were ones he loved at the time, he found quite dull in comparison (I hope that made sense!! I wish I could remember when I heard the interview AND who was being interviewed).

The photographer was bemoaning the loss of archives. He told about seeing a photo of a ball player’s famous (at the time) fumble. The photographer went back into the photo archives of the game to see photo after photo of this same ball player catching the ball. Proving that it was an aberration for him to fumble it.

Nowadays, when we don’t like a photo we simply delete it. If we don’t like how we look in the photo, we delete it. If we don’t like how the food looked, we delete it. Even if we loved how it tasted.

There is no archive. And few of the surviving photos are ever printed. (How many photo albums are on floppy discs that can no longer be read by newer computers?)

Imagine how difficult it’s going to be for future generations to discover who we were and what we did. So much of what we create is digitalized. I can just imagine the comment now when someone comes across a stack of CDs: “Wow!! Look at the size of these poker chips!”

 

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