Swiss Chard Revisited Yet Again (ARF/5-A-Day Tuesday)

summary: Swiss Chard; ARF/5-A-Day Tuesday (click on image to see larger views and more photos)

ARF/5-A-Day Tuesday* – Swiss chard revisited yet again

Yes, I know it’s Thursday. But it was Tuesday two days ago….

Swiss chard Swiss chard is my new favourite vegetable. Red Swiss chard, that is.

Up until recently, my favourite vegetable WAS beet tops – they’re still right up there at on the top (no pun intended…). But the other day when we went to get beets with their tops still on, we only found the most dismal displays. The leaves were ragged and spindly. I guess it’s the end of beet season….

BUT right beside the beets were the most beautiful bunches of red Swiss chard. Well, why not get those instead and prepare them the same way we do beet tops?

Ever since making Indian-style Swiss chard and potatoes (using our recipe for aloo methi), we have been avoiding getting red Swiss chard because of the problem with it wanting to turn black with cooking. A rather frightening looking muddy dark brown actually. But that was before we knew about adding vinegar.

So as T was starting to cook the Swiss chard the other night, I reminded him that I always add a little cider vinegar to beet tops – it’s supposed to set the colour. Here’s how the conversation went:

he (dumping chopped Swiss chard into the already cooked onions and garlic) I’m supposed to add cider vinegar now?

me Just a little – not so much that it will make it sour tasting. But not quite yet. After y…

he Okay… (splashing in a little cider vinegar)

me Whoa!! What are you doing? Not yet! Wait til all the leaves have been tossed in the oil and started to wilt a little!

he (rolling eyes) It will be fine.

me (sigh) mm-hmmm….

And, surprise, surprise, as you can tell from the photograph, the Swiss chard was cooked perfectly. (Don’t you loathe people who are always right?) But, how cool is that?!

The beautiful red colour stayed. Even more than with the beet tops! I’ve always got to start adding the vinegar sooner!

This is the recipe we followed:

Notes:

» Instead of dill seeds, we used fennel seeds, and of course, instead of beet tops, we used coarsely chopped Swiss chard. We also omitted the garam masala and chicken stock powder. We did NOT add any salt at all.

» We added a finely sliced clove of garlic just as the onions were starting to turn gold.

» The most important change is (and one that we’ll apply to the beet tops recipe as well) to add the vinegar immediately after putting in the greens.

Swiss chard Not only is Swiss Chard good for us (don’t forget that it’s one of the superfoods – please see how many “10 best foods” are we eating?.) , but it tastes great. And now that we’ve figured out to add a little vinegar when cooking it, it looks great too.

Swiss Chard is fabulous with a grilled pork chop and oven-roasted potatoes. We ate the potatoes with mayonnaise laced with grainy mustard, of course.

I LOVE dinner!!

* What’s ARF/5-A-Day Tuesday?
To help her in her effort to eat healthily, Cate (Things you Need to Know) came up with the idea for food bloggers to make something that includes an ARF (Antioxidant Rich Food), fruit, veggie or any combination of the three to be posted on her site on Tuesdays.

While I don’t think that Cate is still doing the roundups, it’s still worthwhile taking a look at the roundups that are there.

Swiss chard Read more about ARF/5-A-Day Tuesday:

Previous Swiss Chard posts for ARF/5-A-Day Tuesday

Also see Alanna Kellogg’s (A Veggie Venture)
recipes for Swiss chard.

 

This entry was posted in ARF, crossblogging, food & drink, vegetables on by .

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  • Gadfry! So I’m a firm believer in spinach and kale … I think it’s high time I try the swiss chard. My dad used to grown it in our back yard and I decided then I didn’t like it … probably one of those kid things that I should have long since outgrown and given up ;-)

    Yes, it is high time, Tanna. :-) I used to loathe most vegetables (including all of the greens) when I was a kid. I couldn’t believe that my parents could stomach them. (Ha! Now in retrospect, I should have realized that cooked greens were really good. Unlike with other vegetables, we were never ordered to try “just a little” beet tops or chard. My parents hoovered them all, not wanting to waste any at all on the horrors they had spawned.) -Elizabeth

  • Chris

    I remember my mum serving Swiss Chard with boiled potatoes when I was a kid in Cyprus. Absolutey hated it.

    Tried it in a Greek restaurant a year ago – loved the subtle taste. I now grow red and green Swiss Chard in my garden and have it at least 3 times a week. Great thing about growing this is that you take what you want and it still keeps on growing.

    Super vegetable

    Interesting how that happens, isn’t it, Chris? I would NEVER have considered eating Swiss Chard when I was a kid. Thank goodness I saw the light. -Elizabeth