T’s jerk sauce

go directly to the recipe

recipe: jerk sauce made with habanero and/or Thai chillies

I believe I mentioned in the post about jerk pork in the clay pot that we use doctored President’s Choice jerk sauce.

But we realized that it has been ages since we bought a bottle. It’s likely that there is nothing left of the President’s jerk sauce in the bottle. Here is what is there:

T’s Jerk Sauce …oh yes; it’s HOT

(measurements are approximate)

  • 4 Scotch bonnet peppers – seeds and all (or 12 Thai chillies), chopped finely
  • 3 bunches scallions (green onions), chopped finely
  • 6 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • ½ cup demerara sugar (brown sugar)
  • 2 Tbsp dried thyme leaves
  • 3 Tbsp ground allspice
  • 3 dried cayenne chilies, ground
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1 Tbsp ground black pepper
  • juice of 1 lime
  • ¼ c dark rum

Preparation

  1. Mix it all together (blender is very handy for this) and store in a glass jar in the fridge. It keeps for months.

To use it, put whatever meat you will be jerking (pork, chicken…) into a plastic bag or glass bowl and pour just enough of the jerk sauce to cover (a tablespoon or so per piece of meat). Store the rest of the jerk sauce in a clean glass jar in the fridge.

If you’re barbecuing, allow the meat to marinate in the fridge for a couple of hours, more or less, depending on the tenderness of the meat.

If you’re using the claypot, soak the claypot in cold water. When the claypot is ready, just dump the meat and jerk sauce in a bowl, mix well and dump it into the claypot. Then put it in the oven at 350F or 400F or whatever you’re comfortable with for about 2 hours or until the meat is tender.

Serve jerk over rice, garnish with oven roasted sweet potatoes and go to town!!

edit February 2008: It has been brought to our attention that this jerk sauce is insanely hot. When you have it, make sure to serve plenty of plain rice. You could also offer bowls of yoghurt to douse the flames. Beer works well too.

This entry was posted in food & drink, posts with recipes, side, spicy on by .

* Thank you for visiting. Even though I may not get a chance to reply to you directly, I love seeing your comments and/or questions and read each and every one of them. Please note that your e-mail address will never be displayed by me. Also note that you do NOT have to sign in to Disqus to comment. Click in the "name" box and look for "I'd rather post as a guest" that appears at the bottom of the "Sign up with Disqus". After checking the box, you will be able to proceed with your comment.

"Comment Moderation" is in use. It may take a little time before your comment appears. Comments containing unsolicited advertising will be deleted as spam (which means any subsequent comments will be automatically relegated to the spam section and unlikely to be retrieved). Disqus comment area  wp-image-2332

  • Mats

    OK, i have got to ask – how do you eat a sauce with 3 cayennes and 4 SCOTCH BONNETS ??? I mean, is it done under general anesthetic? That’s very hot!

  • ejm

    Well, we don’t eat ALL the sauce, Mats. But yes, it’s certainly hot. Hence serving it over rice – LOTS of rice. (and cold compresses on hand just in case of overheating. :whee:)

  • OK, NIck will love this, but I think even with cold compresses I will struggle… Maybe I could adjust it using slightly less terrifying chiles?? But the flavours sound intriguing.

  • ejm

    I used to be the same as you, Jeanne. But one gradually gets used to the heat and then suddenly finds oneself craving it. I suppose that it would be okay with less hot chillies but really I think it’s best to use the habaneros (Scotch Bonnets) – just make sure you wear gloves when you are cutting them…

    And then I’d recommend that you make a jerk chicken and just be very very careful eating the skin.

    Oh yes, and make sure that there is plenty of plain rice to eat just in case you find your mouth on fire. Rice is MUCH better for dousing the fire than water – because the oils from the chillies just float on the water and continue to burn.

    Beer is a good douser too. :whee:

  • Pingback: bermuda sleighbells, groundhogs, and jerk sauce « The Gourmet Cartographer()