-,-`--ivy--`-,-

Braids: apricot (3-strand false braid) Banana Cinnamon (Russian braid) . challah (5-strand braid) . challah (6-strand braid) . festive braid (6-strand braid) . 6 strand braiding . Russian Roses (BBB - Russian braid) .

festive braid . Lucia cats (2007) . semi-wild challah . 6 strand braiding . Russian Braids: Banana Cinnamon Bread; BBB October 2012

Six Strand Braiding

December 2008 . January 2009 (video)

Six strand braiding isn't as difficult as it seems. Well, maybe almost as difficult, but it is definitely doable. And braiding bread dough is much easier than braiding hair. The dough stays exactly where it is put.

braiding festive bread © ejm December 2008

6 strand braid © ejm December 2008
6 strand braid © ejm December 2008
6 strand braid © ejm December 2008


braiding © ejm December 2008braiding © ejm December 2008
braiding © ejm December 2008braiding © ejm December 2008
braiding © ejm December 2008braiding © ejm December 2008
braiding © ejm December 2008braiding © ejm December 2008
braiding © ejm December 2008braiding © ejm December 2008

It's much easier to keep track of which strand goes where if you use both hands at once.

braiding © ejm December 2008braiding © ejm December 2008
braid © ejm December 2008

The finished braid. Note how the ends have been tucked under.

braid © ejm December 2008

The sideways "S" shape Lucia shape sideways 'S' of the "occhi di Santa Lucia" (eyes of St. Lucy) is a popular shape for Lucia bread and is used in saffron buns traditionally made all over Scandinavia to celebrate Santa Lucia Day (13 December). Please look at the photos of Lucia buns to see the shaping in more detail.

festive bread © ejm December 2008

Festive bread made with milk, eggs, butter and sugar. Admittedly, this bread was allowed to rise too much and flattened out. Even so, it was completely delicious. Isn't it wonderful that bread is very forgiving! (Please look at more photos of this festive bread.)

festive bread © ejm December 2008

to blog from OUR kitchen: 6 strand braiding video ~ festive bread (bbd#15) ~ six strand braiding ~ semi-wild challah: round I go again (BBBwB)

to recipes from OUR kitchen: Lucia Cats ~ Hot Cross Buns ~ 'Tuck Shop' cinnamon buns ~ banana cinnamon buns ~ semi-wild challah

Six Strand Braiding Video

January 2009

We are gluttons for punishment and put together this video in an attempt to explain the two hand 6-strand braiding technique further.



6 strand braiding video

Six Strand Braiding

  • Divide the dough into 6 equal strands. Join them at one end and spread them out like a fan.
  • Take hold of two strands on the left. Take the 1st from the left strand in your left hand and the 2nd from left strand in your right hand. Your right hand goes all the way over all the strands to the right (keep hold of that strand); your left hand goes over two strands to the middle. Let go of that middle strand.
  • Your right hand is still holding the strand that is now 1st from the right strand (just a moment ago, this strand was the 2nd from the left...). Take the 2nd from right strand in your left hand. Your left hand goes all the way over all the strands to the left (keep hold of that strand); your right hand goes over two strands to the middle. Let go of that middle strand.
  • Your left hand is now holding the strand that is now 1st from the left strand. Take the 2nd from left strand in your right hand. All the way over; far outside strand over two and into the middle.
  • Repeat til finished and tuck ends under.




Santa Lucia

excerpt from www.antiquespectacles.com:

Saint Lucy of Syracuse (284-304), also known as Saint Lucia, Santa Lucia, or Saint Lukia, [...] Patroness of Syracuse, also the principal Catholic representative of the patron saint of the blind and those with eye-trouble; Protector of Eyesight; also patron saint of Opticians, Ophthalmologists and Firemen; the patron saint of the sailor [...]

The chosen feature of her sainthood is not, however, the martyrdom itself, but a previous incident. It was said that her lover had so greatly admired her beautiful eyes that she felt it was a sin. The legend continues, "considering these things and calling to mind the words of Christ, 'If thine eye offend thee, pluck it out and cast it from thee,' and fearing lest her eyes should be the cause of damnation to the young man, she called for a knife and took out her eyes and sent them to her lover in a dish with these words; 'Here hast thou what thou so much desired.' Whereat the young man became utterly astonished and full of grief and remorse became also a convert to Christ. God would not suffer that the blessed Lucia, having given proof of her courage and piety, should remain blind, for one day, as she knelt in prayer her eyes were restored to her more beautiful than before."




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