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Hello from Singapore
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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 10:50 am    Post subject: Hello from Singapore Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 13, 04 - 1:43 AM

Browsing by chance and since there was a recipe called singapore noodles, decided to just drop by and say "helloooooo". Have a blessed day.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 10:51 am    Post subject: Re: Hello from Singapore and Singapore noodlesv Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Aug 13, 04 - 8:27 AM
Related Website: http://etherwork.net/recipes/noodles.html#singapore


Many thanks for dropping by, J Michael.

I'm curious. How close is our singapore noodle recipe to actual Singapore noodles?


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 10:52 am    Post subject: Re: Re: Hello from Singapore and Singapore noodles Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 14, 04 - 2:14 AM

Had the opportunity to try out the recipe twice today. One for our family and another to take away as we were out visiting. Did not have pork on hand so did not include. Chopped up a bunch of coriander leaves and sprinkled over the top for some colour. Used white sesame oil and light soya sauce, as we keep these sauces in the kitchen and use it daily. Will try using the dark sesame oil another time.

Am very pleased indeed with the taste and look of the dish and offer some comments. This creation is truly Singaporean, in that it has incorporated the ingredients and style of cooking used in all the ethnic groups.

With all due respect, at first glance at the recipe it looked Indian/Malay style, because of the powdered spices and dry chillies. Then Chinese with prawns/ mushrooms/Chicken/Pork/Sesame Oil. Can I also comment that the dish is authentic Singaporean cooking!

This dish will go down well at any party or picnic or packed to take with you for any potluck!


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:21 am    Post subject: Re: coriander leaves (aka cilantro) and Singapore noodles Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Aug 15, 04 - 6:01 PM
Related Website: http://etherwork.net/recipes/noodles.html#singapore

I didn't know that coriander leaves came in different sizes. They are usually sold here in bunches and are all roughly the same size.

(In Canada, the leaves of the coriander plant are called "cilantro" by some, "coriander leaves" by others. As far as I know, they are always called "cilantro" in the USA.)

J Michael wrote:
.......................................
: at first glance at the recipe it looked Indian/Malay style, because of
: the powdered spices and dry chillies. Then Chinese with prawns/
: mushrooms/Chicken/Pork/Sesame Oil.
:.............................................

We use the powdered spices in place of "curry powder" which I gather is integral to 'Singapore noodles'. Because we make Indian style curries so often, we just don't happen to have curry powder on hand in our house - we have the individual spices that go into making a curry (although I have put together a recipe for it for use in making chile con carne). I should also note that we often omit the eggs and haven't noticed that there is much loss. The shrimp too are left out if we don't have shrimp on hand.

Another change that we have made is to eliminate the soy sauce. We now use powdered chicken stock to salt the dish. We found that the soy sauce detracted from the flavour of the dish. (I have just noted those changes on the recipe on my site.)

And as you suspected, we use dark sesame oil. I didn't even know that light sesame oil was available. I'm pretty sure I've never seen it on the shelves.

We're very glad to hear that the dish is correct and that you will be inclined to make it again!

our recipe for curry powder


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:22 am    Post subject: Re: Singapore noodles and cilantro Reply with quote

originally posted by MrsBrown on Aug 19, 04 - 12:43 AM

Because of this thread, I decided that I HAD to make Singapore Noodles. It was delicious! My 10 year old son looked at it with narrowed eyes, took a very small amount and sadly, he liked it a lot because he had more and more. I was kind of hoping he wouldn't like it that much so that I could have it for lunch tomorrow.

I used chicken and pork but not eggs. I used some curry powder that was sent to me from Nepal; it has a very light flavour. Because of J Michael's suggestion, I went out to the garden and picked some cilantro--it was a very nice addition.

llizard wrote:
.................
I didn't know that coriander leaves came in different sizes. They are usually sold here in bunches and are all roughly the same size.
..................

MrBrown planted a LOT of cilantro so we have tall plants with large leaves at the bottom and small thin leaves at the top. The small thin leaves are much the same size and shape as dill weed but it has small white flowers. I chop up everything except the hard stems and use it in salsa or Singapore noodles.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:23 am    Post subject: Re: Singapore noodles and cilantro Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Aug 19, 04 - 10:04 AM

Well that is cool, Mrs. Brown! It's nice to hear that the Brown boy likes Singapore noodles, even though it means no lunch for you the following day.

My sister's family came to visit some years ago and one evening were invited to friends' house to dinner. We decided to have Singapore noodles here while they feasted elsewhere. Our nephew was about 12 and wandered into the kitchen. He looked with horror at the wok filled with Singapore noodles and gasped, "Is that what we're having for dinner??" We informed him that it was okay, he was eating dinner elsewhere. I've never seen such a look of relief from anyone. (I'm happy to report that he is older and wiser now. He has seen the light and likes to eat just about all foods.)

As for coriander, it sounds like your coriander is going to seed. This isn't necessarily a bad thing because after the seeds form, you'll be able to plant more. But it does mean that you will soon be without leaves. That's the problem with growing coriander so far north. It bolts so quickly.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:24 am    Post subject: Re: Hello from Singapore Reply with quote

originally posted by CAM on Aug 14, 04 - 1:56 PM

Helloooo to you, too J. Michael! It's wonderful to have your views and suggestions and I hope you will come to llizard's forum again. We like llizard's version of Singapore Noodles and will try some of your ideas.

Do you have some favourite recipes you'd like to share with Canadians?


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:25 am    Post subject: Re: Re: Hello from Singapore Reply with quote

Originally posted by J Michael on Aug 14, 04 - 11:58 PM

Hellooooo...Thank you for the encouragement! And will check llizard's forum daily. Thought to mention, that the coriander leaves I used were the small type, think it's called cilantro, as it gives the fresh aroma.

As we are a mixed lot and someday may share it, have very different taste for food. Then, the family, had the rare priviledge of being able to live in Toowoomba, Queensland for a couple of years and there, found that all my taste for food, sewing/craft, birds and flower interests, gardening, especially, were what I grew up with and blended in very well indeed, much to my frustration when we returned about 20 months ago. It is still taking awhile to settle in. So, think that the better idea would be, say if one was stuck with a question, and will be happy to offer help. If we can't, we'd look around for the answer and something's bound to turn up or vice versa. In fact, after reading the recipe and then got into llzard's website did I realize that there was something I could at last relate to, as this is the 2nd forum that I've ever participated in, the first was in Australia and, must say, both are good and interesting.

Thanks again, llizard and the many others who contribute, for the opportunity to share some of my thoughts and views, thus far.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:25 am    Post subject: Welcome indeed! Reply with quote

originally posted by MEF on Aug 15, 04 - 5:55 AM

I'd like to welcome you as well to lizard's forum. I think you will find it interesting and lively. From Singapore to Queensland and back - big transitions! Why the frustration about the return to Singapore?


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:26 am    Post subject: Re: Welcome indeed! Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 15, 04 - 7:14 AM

Hellooooo... MEF! Thank you!
Because it was an opportunity of a lifetime, took every chance we had to explore the time we had. We made good friends and aquaintances. Volunteered in the kids shooling activities (which I would only read in magazines all this time). Morning Tea??? Wow? did not know what that was. And then, there was the Great Morning Tea day and it was really an experience. Gardening? Had the chance to plant in my tiny planting plot, some king sunflowers, of which I took endless photos of all the stuff I grew, among which were lemon grass, chillie bush, okra, potatoes and strawberries. The next door unit was unoccupied at the time and so, with some time on my hands, I pulled up all the stuff that was growing wild there and slowly, raked up all the weeds. And then... ahhh, I planted a whole row of sunflowers and the sight was breath taking. Then one day, there was a lady next door (the housing agent) and she thought that the gardener had done that, until she saw me watering the plants and then she was amazed and I told her that I just loved to see the flowers and no problem at all. Alas, when the Uni students moved in, all the sunflowers were ruined with their basket ball throwing.

Then had a chance to get together with a number of ladies who were doing sewing/craft and just accomplished so many projects which was only theory, while living in Singapore.

Well, the best ever was I got my driving licence. That was a big deal as it is so difficult to get one here and it was a real hassle as every time I tried to sit just for the theory, I be sick with fever or something would happen till I gave up. I not only passed the auto (mode of transportation while my husband was away for about 6 weeks during the two years), but got the manual licence too and converted it to the Singapore licence, when we came back. With the QLD licence, drove up to Sydney with my family and it was such an experience with me driving and my husband taking the back seat! Then there was the weekly trips to Brisbane for shopping and family visits (my eldest daughter and her family are there as my son-in-law is studying at the Uni, to-date). My daughter also just got her licence last month. They will be back next year or so.

Experienced driving in fog, heavy rain but no hail, thank God for that! We did get a chance to feel the ice falling and see it melting, and the buildup prior to the rains and hail. Missed seeing the frost.

We made use of every minute of the day enjoying every part of the tour. The trip to a farm, with windmills really was breath taking! The animals, the chickens! sheep, cows, koalas in the wild (on the way to Melbourne) and the beautiful birds, the kookaburras...an experience of a lifetime. This is seen everyday and need not go to the zoo. Flowers and jacaranda trees that lined the roads and streets with their flowers every where on the roads, and on the cars and when the wind blew, it just flew away back on to the roads. Pity the cleaners though, but where we lived, I enjoyed sweeping away all the dead leaves and also there was a fresh Rosemary bush growing right outside my unit, of which my driving instructor told me that it was good with lamb and of course, I tried it and it sure was. When I told the landlady, of whom we became very good friends (they will be visiting us next year or so, God willing, did not know it until I told them!).

Got to see the Jondaryn Wool Shed during their festival and again, so much that we took in.

A good friend of ours went kangaroo hunting and accidentally shot a roo with a baby in it's pouch. They did not know it at the time, but when they did, he took it home and fed it some milk and it grew. One day, they just came to my unit and gave me such a wonderful surprise, they went straight to the backyard and there it was a baby joey, right there and of course I had a photo of that too and me carrying it in my arms and later found it that I had been the only fortunate one to see it!

Ahh..now you can see the frustration! Nothing like that ever happening here in a block of 16-storey apartments, where we live on the 4th floor! It's by the highway and all you hear are cars, zipping by all hours of the day and night as against, the sounds of silence and crickets which were frightening at first, but learned to enjoy the night sounds.

I am grateful and blessed for the couple of years, as we learned many things, had the chance to meet many beautiful people, and even prepared for the job we are doing now, back here in Singapore. Yes, sometimes it is frustrating but I must give thanks for every minute of the two years.

Yesterday, we had met up with my husband's colleague while in QLD, and they come for a visit and it just brought back so many memories. I feel so much better today and will catch up with them in an hour or so and they leave tomorrow morning. Thank you all, for the welcome in allowing me to share thoughts and experienc


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:27 am    Post subject: Re: Re: Singapore and Queensland Reply with quote

originally posted by CAM on Aug 15, 04 - 11:15 PM


J Michael, I have never lived in Singapore but I really like Queensland. I lived in Australia for a couple of years in the early 1970s (a long time ago now!) I liked Queensland. I found the people there to be very relaxed, friendly and welcoming.

I have visited Singapore a couple of times. I liked it better the first time (1972) when it was not so expensive. I passed through Singapore again in 2002 on the way to somewhere else in Asia, and I found it very luxurious, very clean and quite regulated (I found it a bit "too tidy" -- I was afraid that I might accidently break one of the rules there!) I'm sure I would enjoy it more if I lived there and got to know some people, but I think it could be quite expensive.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:28 am    Post subject: Re: Re: Re: Hello from Singapore Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Aug 15, 04 - 5:43 PM

J Michael wrote:
.................................
: Thanks again, llizard and the many others who contribute, for the opportunity
: to share some of my thoughts and views, thus far.
:.......................................................

Not at all! The thanks are to you for sharing your thoughts and views with us.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:29 am    Post subject: Singapore Noodles/Litle India/Butter Puff Pastry? Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 16, 04 - 12:16 AM


Switched to broad style and found the better way to read... thanks...

Will try again with the new ingredients. Rice Vermicelli is a very versatile ingredient. There are so many ways/styles and we enjoy it, sometimes for breakfast where it is cooked with sliced onions, a bit of minced garlic, some dark and light soya sauce for colour, green vegetables (chye sim/choy sum (mustard greens), sliced cabbage and a sprinkle of sliced spring onions and sliced fried shallots. Then separately a fish cake (ground fish meat, fried and sliced), or a fried egg, fried chicken wing, with a chillie sauce. I like plain, though, even without the chillie sauce. That's the Chinese style available at almost every corner shop. The easiest and simplest dish.

Sesame oil, yes, we have both light and dark. Sesame seeds also come in black and white.

After cooking the dish, had a browse of the website and then found out that there was a trip to India made and then we saw the connection. That's fine. Will also try the Curry powder given. You might be aware that there are also many brands and kinds of curry powders and some people here make their own and pass on to friends. Little India shops stock heaps of them and just a personal choice will get one going. Also, there are many foreign workers and they flock there to get their fresh vegetables and so we now get to enjoy a wider variety of the Indian dishes and ingredients.

We like the soups, curries, noodles, plain rice as briyani is for special occasions, but we do prepare a rice cooked in chicken stock, dark soy sauce, some sesame oil, white pepper, diced chicken sausage, mushrooms, boneless chicken pieces and vegetables and cooked either in a microwave or rice cooker, every once in a while.

The one thing miss having from QLD supermarts are the PAMPAS puff pastry, sold in sheets in a box of 8 or so. We get them here in a block and have to defrost and roll it out. We have butter puff pastry sold in sheets and wonder if they are the same as the normal puff pastry? Can anyone help?


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:30 am    Post subject: Singapore Noodles - Powdered Chicken Stock Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 16, 04 - 12:00 PM

Knorr has introduced, here in Singapore, the above with "no added msg"..do you have it there too? The same also with the stock cubes.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:30 am    Post subject: Re: Singapore Noodles - Powdered Chicken Stock Reply with quote

Originally posted by MEF on Aug 16, 04 - 12:33 PM

For years I failed to understand how to make stock. I always felt that if I had the bones of two chickens I should end up with about 2litres of stock. Recently I changed my approach and tried 0.5litres with 2 chicken carcasses; instantly, I got stock instead of hot water. I've given up on powdered stuff from Knorr, Bovril, etc. If you really crave hydrolyzed soy/corn/wheat protein and autolyzed yeast extract and colour, then by all means use the powdered stuff. If not, all it takes is a stock pot, cold water, and the remains of any meat dinner or using bones from the butcher and a bit of simmering and you have the real stuff.


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