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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:32 am    Post subject: re: Powdered Chicken Stock Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Aug 16, 04 - 5:44 PM
Related Website: http://etherwork.net/recipes/soup.html#chickstock

MEF, of course, real stock is best when stock is called for. I would never condone using water and powdered chickenstock in place of stock.

We are using powdered chicken stock in place of salt. Yes, it might be considered crass, but our Singapore noodles taste really good.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:32 am    Post subject: Re: Re: Powdered Chicken Stock - Sorry! Reply with quote

originally posted by MEF on Aug 17, 04 - 11:57 AM

Lizard and J Michael, I apologize for my comments about powdered stock; I should have at least looked at the context before butting in!


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:33 am    Post subject: Re: Re: Re: Powdered Chicken Stock - Sorry! Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Aug 17, 04 - 6:04 PM

No problem, MEF! I must admit that I'm a tiny bit embarrassed to admit that we use powdered stock instead of salt. I pretend that it's like using anchovies or soy sauce instead of salt.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:34 am    Post subject: Re: Re: Lazy stock Reply with quote

originally posted by CAMon Aug 17, 04 - 9:27 PM

MEF, I am very lazy when it comes to cooking, so never seem to have real stock around when I want it. We have found some very good "natural" stock in a tetra pack -- no junk or MSG or other awful stuff in it. But it's always too much for what we want, so we finally figure out the trick of pouring the leftover stock into ice cube trays and freezing them. May seem obvious (duh!), but before we figured this out we wasted a lot of stock by leaving it in the fridge too long.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:34 am    Post subject: Singapore Noodles/Powdered Chicken Stock Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 19, 04 - 11:06 AM

Helloooo... MEF, no worries at all. llizard...just an update, had another opportunity to test the Singapore Noodles with the Powdered Chicken Stock (used as salt) but I had to use a pinch of salt (three fingers worth) and the ingredients I used were sliced chicken breast, diced fish cake, diced chicken sausage and local choy sum (locally called chye sim) and it went well, again. The dish is very versatile indeed and tastes good without the soy sauce and sesame oil (I actually forgot to include it as my 2 guests had turned up an hour earlier than expected).


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:35 am    Post subject: Lazy Stock Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 19, 04 - 11:11 AM

MEF..this one I've gotta add... I had the same problem too until the idea of the ice cube trays... mine turned out to be "science experiments" as my husband and children put it heh heh heh....


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:36 am    Post subject: Garnishing Herbs - Coriander leaves (Cilantro) and Chinese C Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 19, 04 - 8:10 PM

Thanks to all for the little notes on cilantro, finally know the name of what I thought was the "big type" of coriander leaves. Found, in Wendy Hutton's Singapore Food cookbook, she classifies -

Coriander leaves - Used by all local cooks for flavouring and garnishing, this leaf has a delightful, faintly peppery taste. It is often called 'Chinese parsley' overseas, although in Europe it is known as cilantro. Coriander leves can easily be grown or in a pot from the whole coriander seeds bought as a spice. Pick when the plant is about 20-25 cm (8-10 in) high. Coriander leaves can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for about 1 week, provided the condensation is wiped off the inside of the lid every day or so.

Celery Leaves - 'Local' or 'Chinese' celery, as it is called in Singapore, is smaller and more pungent than the large white celery grown outside Asia. The leaves and top portion of the centre of large celery can be used as a substitute.

We use the same way as coriander leaves, chopped up and sprinkled over noodles, fried rice, curries, some soup dishes and a matter of taste/aroma preference (mum loves this type and me coriander/cilantro).

Some cooks also use chopped spring onions (green onion) but I occasionally use as my preference is cilantro. Usually, buy about 150gm worth of cilantro and use it for all my garnishes. The only time I buy say 50gm worth of spring onions is when I use it as a base, instead of sliced onions in the recipe for Szechuan Fried Fish, then the lot goes in and there are no "science projects" (that's my family, especially my husband's term for anything I had left over in the container in the fridge and turned mouldy, 'cos I forgot I had them there. Lessons learned.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 11:37 am    Post subject: Re: Science projects Reply with quote

originally posted by CAM on Aug 20, 04 - 1:59 AM

Cultivating "science projects" is one thing I'm very good at in the kitchen... I don't know how many I have on the go at this time.


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