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Beer Can Chicken

 
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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:31 pm    Post subject: Beer Can Chicken Reply with quote

originally posted by MrsBrown on Jun 15, 04 - 7:36 AM

originally a starblvd post MrsBrown, May/16/2004 20:54:02 [-05 EST]
related page: Beer Can Chicken by the Surreal Gourmet

One of my colleagues was talking about how wonderful Beer can chicken was so, of course, I had to try it. It's as wonderful as my colleague said--moist, juicy, delicious! It was very simple to prepare and took about the amount of time that Bob Blumer suggests. We also had grilled asparagus (not bad but not as good as the Urban Peasant's ginger garlic asparagus), grilled garlic and pepper potatoes and steamed broccoli. MMMMM, what a great dinner. I feel kind of full.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:32 pm    Post subject: Oh, I forgot to say... Reply with quote

originally posted by MrsBrown on Jun 15, 04 - 7:36 AM

originally a starblvd post by MrsBrown, May/16/2004 20:55:27 [-05 EST]

We only had some Corona beer which comes in a bottle. I poured it into an empty pop can which seemed to work just as well. I wonder if I should have called it "Beer in a pop can chicken"?


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:33 pm    Post subject: Urban Peasant's ginger garlic asparagus? Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Jun 15, 04 - 7:38 AM

originally a starblvd post by llizard, May/17/2004 10:20:47 [-05 EST]

As soon as I saw the reference to the Urban Peasant, I imagined I could hear him saying in that really annoying voice he has, "and if you don't have ginger, use turnip" or something equally ludicrous. I really did hear him say "and if you don't have chilies, use turmeric" once when he was making some sort of stew.

Which immediately led me to remember the time I saw him preparing mustard/marmelade chicken. He put the raw chicken on his board. He removed the skin.

Then with raw chickeny hands, he picked up the mustard jar, opened it and dipped a spoon in. He held the chicken down with one hand as he smeared the mustard onto the chicken, using the back of the spoon. Then with raw chicken mustardy hands, he picked up the marmelade jar, opened it, and using the SAME spoon, dipped in to get some marmelade. He held the chicken down to smear the marmelade on with the back of the spoon. Then he decided that maybe a bit more mustard was in order so he dipped back into the mustard jar and smeared a little more mustard on. He slapped the chicken onto a grill and WITHOUT cleaning the board, chopped some parsley to use as garnish for when the chicken was done!

So to summarize: he had a just opened jar of mustard with raw chicken juices AND marmelade sullying it, a just opened jar of marmelade with raw chicken juices AND mustard sullying it, a counter covered with raw chicken juices, mustard, marmelade, a few parsley leaves and a little bowl of uncooked parsley/mustard/marmelade/chickenjuice garnish festering under the hot studio lights. I sure wouldn't want to eat dinner at HIS house!

However, even though I have this horror of the Urban Peasant, I'd love to learn more about ginger garlic asparagus.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:37 pm    Post subject: ginger garlic asparagus Reply with quote

originally posted by MrsBrown on Jun 15, 04 - 7:39 AM

originally a starblvd post by
MrsBrown, May/17/2004 20:44:10 [-05 EST]


This is the default recipe I use for asparagus. It's very quick and delicious.

Heat a skillet to very high heat. While it's heating, chop up 2 or 3 garlic cloves and about an inch of fresh ginger. Slice some asparagus (asparaguses?) in long thin slices. They will be about 2 inches long and about 1/4 inch wide. When the pan is smoking hot, put in about 1 tbsp olive oil. Immediately put in the garlic, ginger and asparagus. Stir it around until the asparagus is glistening. Put the lid on and let it cook for about a minute. Toss on a tablespoon or so of wine or balsamic vinegar or cider vinegar or sherry and let it cook covered for another minute. Take it off the heat, put it in an attractive dish and serve it. Fantastic!

edit: This is fabulous! -ejm blog from OUR kitchen: asparagus


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:37 pm    Post subject: maybe I would even like the stalks that way Reply with quote

originally posted by blm on Jun 15, 04 - 7:39 AM

originally a starblvd post by
blm, May/17/2004 22:30:50 [-05 EST]


I really only like the heads of asparagus. I find even the top part of the stalk has an unpleasant texture. I've never thought of cutting the stalks lengthwise. (Aside from that, the hot-pan/ginger/garlic/wine combination sounds great.)


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:38 pm    Post subject: Vegetables in a hot pan Reply with quote

originally posted by MEF on Jun 15, 04 - 7:40 AM

originally a starblvd post by
MEF, May/18/2004 10:28:31 [-05 EST]


After decades of steaming vegetables, I too have discovered the Mrs.Brown Method. Super hot pan, a little olive oil, a bit of stirring, a small shot of soy sauce and stock, lid on for a minute or so - and Bob's your uncle! My move to this method was inspired by reading Mario Batali (of "Molto" fame).


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:38 pm    Post subject: slicing asparagus Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Jun 15, 04 - 7:41 AM

originally a starblvd post by
llizard, May/19/2004 09:32:00 [-05 EST]


MrsBrown, when you say "Slice some asparagus in long thin slices", you mean crossways, don't you? Not julienned (like Frenched beans)?

This asparagus recipe does sound good - although I can't imagine anything more satisfying than asparagus steamed to al dente and drizzled with a little butter and lemon juice. (Okay, I can imagine one possibly more satisfying way would be asparagus garnished liberally with a good slabber of Hollandaise sauce but that, of course, is tres tres bad for one.)


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:39 pm    Post subject: Re: slicing asparagus Reply with quote

originally posted by MrsBrown on Jun 15, 04 - 7:42 AM

originally a starblvd post by
MrsBrown, May/19/2004 11:21:39 [-05 EST]


I mean julienned like French cut green beans. I slice asparagus on the diagonal. Depending on the thickness of the asparagus (I prefer thinner asparagus, MrBrown prefers fat asparagus), sometimes it's like a French cut green bean, somtimes it's like a carrot stick with diagonal ends--if that's even remotely understandable.

Nope, even the Hollandaise sauce doesn't attract me as much as this. Sometimes (very very rarely) there are a few pieces of asparagus left after dinner so I snatch them up before MrBrown gets his fingers on them "just to finish them up so I don't have to put them away" and put them in my salad for lunch the next day. Once I actually moaned in pleasure when I tasted a piece of asparagus hidden in my salad.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:40 pm    Post subject: slicing terms Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Jun 15, 04 - 7:43 AM

originally a starblvd post by
llizard, May/20/2004 06:28:36 [-05 EST]


Now I'm really confused, MrsBrown. When I say "Frenched" beans, I mean they are sliced lengthwise so that they become very thin. I'm guessing that you do not mean the same thing when you say "Frenched".

From the phrase "I slice asparagus on the diagonal", I envision penne when I imagine your slices of asparagus. Is that a correct interpretation?


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:40 pm    Post subject: Re: slicing terms Reply with quote

originally posted by MrsBrown on Jun 15, 04 - 7:43 AM

originally a starblvd post by
MrsBrown, May/20/2004 08:52:52 [-05 EST]


You can slice them up the middle or you can make them like long thin penne. I guess mine are like long thin penne. At any rate, you cut the asparagus the long skinny way rather than the short fat way.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:41 pm    Post subject: At this point I want a diagram! Reply with quote

originally posted by MEF on Jun 15, 04 - 7:45 AM

originally a starblvd post by
MEF, May/20/2004 09:49:58 [-05 EST]


When the following terms fail, I wanna picher:

CHOP: To cut food into smaller pieces, usually with large knife and cutting board. One hand holds knife tip on the board; the other moves blade up and down, cutting through the food.

CUBE: To cut a solid into little cubes from about 1/2 inch to an inch.

DICE: To cube but to make the cubes smaller - less than 1/2 inch. Use a cutting board and a very sharp knife, or a special cubing gadget.

FLAKE: To break or pull apart a food, like chicken or fish, that divides naturally. All you do is follow these divisions, pulling at them gently with one or two forks. Or flake with your fingers.

GRATE: To tear off coarse-to-fine particles of food with a hand grater or mechanical device.

GRIND: To put food through chopper. Choppers have two or three blades. Use a blade with smaller holes to grind foods fine; one with the larger holes for coarse chopping or grinding.

JULIENNE: To cut potatoes or vegetables into matchlike sticks.

MINCE: To cut food in pieces, but finer than chopped. Mincing takes the same steps: Use cutting board and sharp knife, chopping knife and wooden bowl, or scissors - just do it longer.

SHRED: To cut or tear in long, narrow pieces. The fineness varies - recipes often say that foods should be 'finely" or "coarsely " shredded. Use a hand or mechanical shredder; or cut crisp vegetables, like cabbage, to shreds with a sharp knife.

SLIVER: To cut or splinter into long, thin strips, with a sharp knife on a cutting board.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:42 pm    Post subject: asparagus - to slice or not to slice Reply with quote

originally posted by llizard on Jun 15, 04 - 7:46 AM

originally a starblvd post by
llizard, May/20/2004 10:36:11 [-05 EST]


MrsBrown wrote:
.........................................
: I guess mine are like long thin penne. At any rate, you cut
: the asparagus the long skinny way rather than the short fat way.
:...............................................

Actually, I don't usually slice aspagarus at all. I hold them at either end, bend the ends toward each other until the stalk breaks. I discard (compost) the tail end and steam the head end.


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PostPosted: Thu 14 Oct, 2004 3:42 pm    Post subject: Re: Beer Can Chicken/Aspagarus Reply with quote

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 20, 04 - 5:14 AM

Hellloooo... Mrs Brown! Greetings!
Took an interest in the Beer Can Chicken as I just noted The Surreal Gourmet series now showing on tv in the mornings and saw that dish last week. Thanks for the website address and had a browse there too. This week saw a snack which he did with cashews and honey and it looked interesting. Must try.

The other is asparagus. That's just about the way we eat it here, with ginger/garlic, sometimes with sliced red chilli and fish cakes, stir fried and a little stock. Eaten with rice and a main dish. Yum! With give yours idea a try one of these days.


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