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Yeast: Summer 2006 . Summer 2009 . Conversions

Yeast and Bread in the Summer

Summer 2006

In the summertime, bread takes much less time to rise because the kitchen temperature is so warm. Focaccia or naan can be mixed and kneaded at around 17:00 then shaped and baked on the barbecue around 19:00.

bread baked  - July 2006

Many people now-a-days recommend adding instant dry yeast directly to the dry ingredients. I like to rehydrate active dry yeast first and make sure it's starting to foam before I add it to the rest of the dough. We think the bread turns out better.

Here is 1 tsp active dry yeast from a jar in refrigerator

yeast  - July 2006

ten minutes to five; ¼ c lukewarm water (baby bottle temperature) added to yeast; yeast and water mixed well and left to stand;

time: 16:50  - July 2006 lukewarm water added to yeast  - July 2006 yeast mixed in - July 2006

As the other ingredients are being mixed in a larger bowl, the yeast begins to bubble at eight minutes to five.

time: 16:53  - July 2006 yeast beginning to bubble - July 2006

And at one minute to five, the yeast is quite foamy.

time: 16:58  - July 2006 yeast foaming  - July 2006
yeast foaming  - July 2006

The foamy yeast is mixed into the other ingredients and the bread is kneaded. By quarter past five, it's ready to be covered and left on the counter to rise. (See yeast and dough mixing done the next day)

kneaded dough - July 2006 time: 17:16  - July 2006

By ten to seven, the dough is ready for shaping and baking.

time: 18:50  - July 2006dough risen  - July 2006

dough risen  - July 2006

And by four minutes after seven, the bread is baked. (See photos of baking bread on the barbecue.)

time: 19:04  - July 2006 bread baked  - July 2006

to photos of baking Hamburger Buns on the barbecue

to recipes from OUR kitchen - focaccia, naan, pita, etc.
to blog from OUR kitchen - yeast and breadmaking in the summer
to blog from OUR kitchen - yeast and breadmaking in the summer revisited
to blog from OUR kitchen - making buns on the bbq



Yeast and Breaddough the Next Day
(twice the previous day's recipe)

scroll up and down to see more photos

rehydrated active dry yeast foaming

yeast foaming - July 2006

How it began: 2 tsp active dry yeast from a jar in refrigerator

yeast  - July 2006

At 4:02pm the yeast is rehydrated with ¼ c lukewarm water and a pinch of sugar and left to stand as other ingredients are mixed.

time: 16:01  - July 2006 yeast hydrated  - July 2006

At 4:13pm the yeast is foaming and ready to be added to the other ingredients.

time: 16:12  - July 2006 yeast foaming  - July 2006

breaddough is roughly mixed (rehydrated active dry yeast on side)

breaddough roughly mixed - July 2006

rehydrated yeast added to bread dough and ready for kneading.

bread dough mixed and ready for kneading - July 2006

(See continuation of process with previous day's bread dough)



to recipes from OUR kitchen: focaccia, naan, pita, etc.

to blog from OUR kitchen: yeast and breadmaking in the summer ~ yeast and breadmaking in the summer revisited ~ making buns on the bbq ~ What has happened to the baking aisle at the supermarket? ~ Yeast Equivalents - AGAIN

Fleischmann's

While I was in the baking aisle, I looked at the shelves to see "active dry", "instant - bread machines", "instant - quick rise", and [get ready for this...] "instant - pizza crust yeast". What?!! As usual, I chose "active dry". (If I lived in the USA, "fresh compressed" would be another option. But for some unknown reason, Fleischmann's fresh yeast is not available in Canada.)

yeast

Why do I always choose Fleischmann's active dry yeast? Because that's what my mother always uses.

yeast





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