Favourite Movies / Sometimes you can't go back...

posts from 13 October 2004 to 14 March 2011
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ejm
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Favourite Movies / Sometimes you can't go back...

Post by ejm »

We recently watched "Bull Durham" again. I remembered loving it. But it just wasn't the same. The opening was still great. But for me, it just fell flat.

I did have it on the "almost ran" section of my top 100 movies list but have now removed it entirely.

Is it a Kevin Costner thing? For some reason, his acting suddenly bugs me. Ever since "Dances With Wolves" and "Message in a Bottle" (brrrrrrrr).

Does this sort of thing happen to you?

Now I'm afraid to watch other things I loved. I don't want to burst the bubble.

(We also recently watched "Field of Dreams" again and Costner didn't annoy me at all. The movie was a wonderful as I remembered.)
David
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Post by David »

Some war movies and westerns I remember enjoying as a child 1960s were 20 to 25 years old at the time. Some of those movies are now around 65 years old and the language, acting styles and pace make many of them almost unwatchable today with my attention span eroded by 20 years of fast-paced action movies aimed at the MTV generation. Yet I can still enjoy watching some thrillers and comedies with my teenage children and some of those movies are older than their grandparents. I guess that's difference the between an old movie and a classic movie.
ejm
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Post by ejm »

David wrote:I guess that's difference the between an old movie and a classic movie.
And there's the trick. How can you tell whether it's old or classic?

For instance:

"Monty Python" would be considered as classic. I remember laughing so much that it hurt. I've watched a few re-runs and I can't see what was funny. Is it me? (Yikes!! Have I lost my sense of humour?)

Is "Blazing Saddles" a classic or is it just old?

"Shane" is considered a classic. It's HORRIBLE. (Or at least I think so.)

"3:10 to Yuma" (1957 version) is a classic and it's just as fabulous now as it was when I saw it for the first time on a late movie sometime in the 1970s



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Speaking of "3:10 to Yuma", why didn't Russell Crowe do a remake of Shane? It's a decent story and could be a good movie AND would likely be an improvement to the original rather than a somewhat dull mirror-image the way that "3:10 to Yuma" (2007 version) was.
So... have YOU backed up your files lately? And defragged too!?
DataRyder
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Post by DataRyder »

This is one we will come back to.

We recently came across a wonderful 1956 film called Le Ballon rouge (The Red Balloon). It won an Oscar and a Palme d'Or in the short film category.

Here's the WikiPedia link: Wiki

The film is beautifully shot on the streets of Paris. Link here for a few screen shots from the movie: Red Ballon

- Dataryder
At this point all I can tell you is; what we do know is far less than what we don't know.
CAM
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Re: Favourite Movies / Sometimes you can't go back...

Post by CAM »

ejm wrote:Is it a Kevin Costner thing? For some reason, his acting suddenly bugs me.
I liked him in a crummy movie about a body guard. Most of his other movies need considerable editing, including dances with wolves.
<i>Strange to see how a good dinner and feasting reconciles everybody.</i> --Samuel Pepys
MrsBrown
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Post by MrsBrown »

I just watched a new favourite: Amelie. Oh sigh. What a wonderful movie. Rotten Tomatoes gives it 90%. Am I the last person to see this wonderful movie?

I know what you mean about Kevin Costner. When is someone going to tell him that he's lost his looks and he can't act anymore? I'll still watch Silverado because it has Kevin Kline, Brian Dennehy, Linda Hunt and Jeff Goldblum to make up for Kevin Costner. I'll also watch Field of Dreams because I love the story and he didn't wreck it.
David
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Post by David »

MrsBrown wrote:I just watched a new favourite: Amelie. Oh sigh. What a wonderful movie. Rotten Tomatoes gives it 90%. Am I the last person to see this wonderful movie?
I watched Amélie again last week. It really is great movie.

I can also recommend Delicatessen (black comedy) and City Of Lost Children (dystopian fantasy), both also directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet and featuring some of the same actors as Amélie.
ejm
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Post by ejm »

MrsBrown wrote:I just watched a new favourite: Amelie. Oh sigh. What a wonderful movie. Rotten Tomatoes gives it 90%. Am I the last person to see this wonderful movie?
We loved Amelie (aka Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain) too. I see that IMDB only gives it 86%.

Because of Audrey Tautou, we also saw Vénus beauté (institut). Surprisingly, IMDB's score for that is only 64%. It's been a while since we saw it, but I remember quite liking it.

IMDB: Amelie
IMDB: Vénus beauté (institut)
David wrote:I can also recommend Delicatessen (black comedy) and City Of Lost Children (dystopian fantasy), both also directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet and featuring some of the same actors as Amélie.
I keep meaning to see City Of Lost Children but I don't think I can manage Delicatessen. It's just a little tooooo dark for my taste (yikes, no pun intended there).
So... have YOU backed up your files lately? And defragged too!?
CAM
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Post by CAM »

David wrote:difference the between an old movie and a classic movie.
I couldn't sleep on the plane coming back from Asia, and watched six classic movies that I'd never seen before. One was "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" with Gregory Peck, Susan Hayward and Ava Gardner. Made in 1952 based on a Hemingway novel. Worth watching. Black and White. I loved Ava Gardner!

I also enjoyed "To Kill a Mockingbird" which is interesting for the way race, class, age and disability are portrayed. The point of view is also very interesting.

I also enjoyed a really trashy 1952 film called Captain Scarlet, which was hilarious http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045605/usercomments. It featured Richard Greene, famous for being the first television Robin Hood ( :ohoh: Robin Hood, Robin Hood, riding through the glen; RH, RH, with his band of men; Feared by the bad, Loved by the Good, RH, RH, RH). The above review says the film is "deeply flawed" and they are right. Richard Greene is a very witty leading man and I loved the supposedly bad swordplay. Only for watching on a very long flight when there's nothing left to watch and one has no energy to read.

There were also two episodes of an interesting BBC miniseries drama on Saddam Hussein, called "House of Saddam" about the last months of the Saddam Hussein regime. The main point of view is that of members of the Hussein family. I'd like to see the other episodes but can't find them.

I was disappointed that the flight came to an end and I couldn't see the end of "Let's Live a Little" http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040535/usercomments, a silly comedy with Bob Cummings and the stunning Hedy Lamarr. Probably not worth it...
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