no problems with indigestion when making dhokla

posts from 13 October 2004 to 14 March 2011
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ejm
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no problems with indigestion when making dhokla

Post by ejm »

A recent article about Gujarati food in SAVEUR magazine has made us suddenly neeeeeed to have Gujarati food. It sounds fabulous.

There are several wonderful looking recipes in the article. However, there was no recipe for dhokla.

So we looked on the internet. Here is our favourite recipe simply because of the ingredients:

YouTube: Dhokla (Suji - Semolina)

Please make sure that you watch until at least the 1:04 mark on the video
David
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Post by David »

A spoon of what? If you are such a bad cook that you know that your food will make people ill, I suppose it makes sense to add a cure to the recipe.
Barbara
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Post by Barbara »

!!!

It's [spoiler]"fruit salt"[/spoiler] - from poking around the net a bit, it sounds like it is a common ingredient in Indian cooking.

Manjula's videos are pretty good. I'm not sure about the "soft and spongy" dhokla though. The Besan Paare sound more appetizing.
ejm
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Post by ejm »

Barbara wrote:It's [spoiler]"fruit salt"[/spoiler] - from poking around the net a bit, it sounds like it is a common ingredient in Indian cooking.
I thought that it was [spoiler]bicarbonate of soda (ie:baking soda) and that maybe baking soda is not that easy to find in India[/spoiler]
Barbara wrote:I'm not sure about the "soft and spongy" dhokla though. The Besan Paare sound more appetizing.
We tried dhokla and it's pretty good but I have to say that the "soft and spongy" aspect of it put me off a little. Some of our dhokla was done more than others and became chewy. THAT part was delicious! I am planning to post about it on the blog but I got distracted by Christmas.
David
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Post by David »

According to the manufacturers GlaxoSmithKline http://www.gsk.com/products/consumer-healthcare/eno.htm Eno is an antacid drug. I am not convinced that adding it to food is a good idea.
ejm
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Post by ejm »

David wrote:According to the manufacturers GlaxoSmithKline http://www.gsk.com/products/consumer-healthcare/eno.htm Eno is an antacid drug. I am not convinced that adding it to food is a good idea.
Yes, so is bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) an antacid.

I gather that Eno is "bicarbonate of soda, tartaric acid and Rochelle Salt". Apparently, "Rochelle salt" is potassium sodium tartrate. but bicarbonate of soda mixed with tartaric acid and/or potassium sodium tartrate works out to be the same as baking powder.

We use baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) in our dhokla.

And, of course, we add baking soda to many things we eat.

Perhaps it's difficult to find baking soda in stores in India but Eno is readily available? (I'm not sure that I would ever use Eno as a substitute for baking soda or baking powder though. I suspect it's WAY more expensive.)
CAM
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Post by CAM »

I was intrigued, so sleuthed around on the net and discovered that Eno [spoiler]fruit salts is a substitute for bicarbonate of soda, which can also be used. But that the fruit salts don't add any bitter taste as baking soda might. [/spoiler]
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