Mayonnaise and Tomato Pie

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Mayonnaise and Tomato Pie

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by MrsBrown on Aug 29, 04 - 5:36 PM
Related Website: salad.allrecipes.com/az/CkdMynnis.asp

I made my own mayonnaise!! I had no idea it was so simple to make.

The tomatoes in the garden are coming ripe at a quick rate--why can't tomatoes come ripe 1 or 2 or even 3 at a time instead of 25 at once??--not that I'm complaining, I love tomatoes. Since we had so many tomatoes, I decided to make tomato pie (recipe to follow). It has mayonnaise in it and normally, I would use the kind in the jar but MrBrown Will Not Eat Sugar even the little bit that's in mayonnaise. I NEEDED to have tomato pie so I decided to make my own mayonnaise. How incredibly simple and I probably won't buy prepared mayonnaise again. MrBrown is very pleased to have some mayonnaise that he can eat.

Tomato Pie

Double Biscuit Dough Crust

2 cups flour
4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup butter
approx 3/4 cup milk

Filling:
2 lbs tomatoes, sliced thinly
2 or 3 tbsp fresh basil OR chives OR green onions, finely chopped
1 1/2 cups cheese, divided
1/3 cup mayonnaise thinned with 2 tbsp lemon juice

To make the dough:
Blend dry ingredients together. Rub the butter into the flour mixture until well blended (about the size of coarse cornmeal). Add the milk until you have a not-too-sticky dough. Turn it out on a floured board and knead about 5 times. Roll out half of it to fit a 9 inch pie plate.

To make the pie:
Lay the tomato slices over the crust. Scatter the basil over the tomatoes. Sprinkle 1 cup cheese. Drizzle mayonnaise/lemon juice mixture over. Top with the rest of the cheese. Roll out the remaining dough, fit it over the filling and pinch the edges of the dough together to seal them. Cut several steam vents into he top crust and bake the pie at 400 F for about 25 minutes.

From More Home Cooking by Laurie Colwin.

Laurie Colwin says that "the secret to this pie is to reheat it before serving, which among other things ensures that the cheese is soft and gooey." She makes it in the morning and then reheats it in the evening in a 350 oven until it's hot.

I just took the pie out of the oven and will let it cool until supper when I will reheat it and have it with corn on the cob and some beets out of the garden. Don't you just love summer???
Last edited by bravenet_archive on Sun 23 Nov, 2014 1:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Mayonnaise and Tomato Pie

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by CAM on Aug 30, 04 - 8:50 PM

Related Website: http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recipe ... ?mid=16883

I use Hellman's Real Mayonnaise, but I see it has sugar in it! I had not recalled this. There is a recipe for copycat Hellman's at the noted webpage.
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Re: Mayonnaise and Tomato Pie

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by llizard on Aug 31, 04 - 9:00 AM
Related Website: http://salad.allrecipes.com/az/CkdMynnis.asp

MrsBrown wrote:
............................
: The tomatoes in the garden are coming ripe at a quick
: rate [...] Since we had so many tomatoes, [...]
:........................................

Oh oh oh! I have tomato envy! We have zero tomatoes growing in our shady garden. And sadly, the local farmers and greengrocers are so worried about spoilage and bruising that they pick their tomatoes green so that the tomatoes don't ripen on the vine.

I bet that pie is great! It almost ("almost" being the keyword) makes me want to cut down the trees in our back garden so that we will have an embarrassment of tomatoes too so we would have the same problem about what to do with the tomatoes. (Tomato and dill sandwiches - with a little mayonnaise - are my favourite kind of sandwiches.)

As for making one's own mayonnaise, the thing that always concerned me was using raw egg. But the method in the recipe you posted cleverly cooks the eggyolk.

Like CAM, we have always used Hellmann's as well (I note that the copycat Hellmann's recipe CAM posted does not call for sugar even though real Hellmann's does have sugar....

Only a couple of times in my life have I ever had real mayonnaise and I know that all it had in it was eggyolk, oil, mustard, lemonjuice, salt and pepper. And it was fantastic mayonnaise. Now that you have posted this coddling method for the egg, I think we neeeeeeeeed to make our own mayonnaise as well. I think we will combine the ideas in both the mayonnaise recipes. I do like the Hellmann's copycat idea of adding a dash of cayenne.

MrsBrown, what kind of oil did you use? Canola? Olive?
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Re: Re: Mayonnaise and Tomato Pie

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by MrsBrown on Aug 31, 04 - 11:04 AM

llizard wrote:
...........................
.MrsBrown, what kind of oil did you use? Canola? Olive?
...........................

I used canola. I had the same issues with the raw egg so when I saw the cooked egg mayonnaise, I was happy, happy, happy. I used a little too much pepper. If it were to have been Pepper Mayonnaise, it would have been perfect but for plain mayonnaise, it was a little peppery. I think next time, I'll add a little cayenne and use less pepper.
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mayonnaise and raw eggs

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by blm on Aug 31, 04 - 3:09 PM
Related Website: http://www.foodhistory.com/foodnotes/le ... mayo/info/

According to the related site you can safely use egg substitute for mayonnaise.

It doesn't say whether it tastes any good, though.

On another site, url]http://www.fact-index.com/m/ma/mayonnaise.html[/url], I read that commercial mayonnaise either uses pasteurization, freezing, water or other emulsifiers (I guess "other emulsifiers" would be something like egg substitutes). It also says that some stores sell pasteurized eggs - I don't know if I just haven't looked, but I haven't seen any.
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Re: Mayonnaise

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by llizard on Sep 4, 04 - 7:02 PM
Related Website: http://salad.allrecipes.com/az/CkdMynnis.asp

We added a tiny bit of cayenne to the related site recipe that MrsBrown pointed out. We reduced the sugar drastically, using only a pinch to round out the flavour. We think perhaps we added a little too much cayenne and not quite enough oil (safflower rather than canola because that's what we had in the cupboard). And you're right, it was very very easy. The result was pretty terrific - very lemony and a little piquante. But it wasn't mayonnaise. This really quite spectacular sauce went very well with oven roasted potatoes, steamed green beans and grilled chicken. We will definitely try again to tweak the recipe so that we can make our own mayonnaise but for now, as tough as it is to admit it, Hellmann's is still superior.
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Re: Mayonnaise

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by MrsBrown on Sep 4, 04 - 11:10 PM

llizard wrote:
..........................
>But it wasn't mayonnaise.
..........................

What made it not mayonnaise? Was it too saucy? Mine was fairly firm; after letting it get cold in the refrigerator overnight, I was able to put some on a knife and spread it. It wasn't as firm as Hellmann's but it held its shape.
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re: Mayonnaise

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by llizard on Sep 5, 04 - 10:43 AM
Related Website: http://salad.allrecipes.com/az/CkdMynnis.asp

MrsBrown wrote:
................................
: What made it not mayonnaise? Was it too saucy?
:......................................................

Yes, it was too saucy. It did hold its shape but as you say, it was not as firm as Hellmann's. Even after refrigerating overnight, it was still on the loose side. we had it on chicken sandwiches for lunch. The sauce on the sandwiches was very good but it was more the consistancy of salad dressing rather than mayonnaise.

I wonder if it has anything to do with the size of our eggyolks. We do buy x-large eggs. This is why I think we should have added more oil. I also wonder if it should be half lemon juice and half white vinegar because the sauce was very lemony tasting.
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Raw Eggs

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by MEF on Aug 31, 04 - 1:10 PM
Related Website : http://www.inspection.gc.ca
Don’t eat raw eggs.
Cook eggs until the egg yolks and the egg whites are firm, not runny.
Cook fried eggs on both sides.
Cook scrambled eggs until firm all the way through.
Don’t eat foods that contain raw or lightly cooked eggs, e.g. Caesar salad, raw cookie dough, ice cream, mousses, Hollandaise sauce, mayonnaise and eggnog.
This is a direct quote from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency; I don't think the advice can be any clearer. Still, we see countless recipes and products that contain raw eggs. Is this just another version of Russian Roulette?!
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a few other tomato ideas

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by llizard (green with envy) on Aug 31, 04 - 9:07 AM
Related Website: http://etherwork.net/recipes/roastedveg ... tml#tomato

MrsBrown, you might think about drying some of your zillions of tomatoes. We use plum tomatoes when we dry them but I would think one could dry any kind of tomato. They have an amazing flavour when they're dried and go very well on pizza, not to mention being wonderful snacking items.

And I'm guessing that you may have a lot of green tomatoes as well. Green tomato mincemeat is truly fantastic.
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Re: oven dried tomatoes

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by MrsBrown on Sep 3, 04 - 11:54 AM

These sound lovely. I'll try them tonight with about 8 tomatoes. How do you store them?

MrBrown came in from the garden this morning worrying about possible blight on the tomatoes. He seems to think the tomatoes are almost done. Last year we uprooted the plants and hung them upside down in the garage and we had tomatoes for about a month. We lost a few to blight but generally, they were good. Not as lovely as tomatoes fresh out of the garden but better than the tomatoes at the super market.
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Re: Re: oven dried tomatoes

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by llizard on Sep 4, 04 - 9:44 AM

MrsBrown, we just put them in a glass jar in the fridge. They are usually eaten within a month (I find that they are a bit like raisins - or dates, as described in that wonderful poem "Dates" by Piet Hein
  • " [...]
    you eat enough
    you eat some more
    [...]
    you wash your hands
    and then you go
    and take another one "

My guess is that beefsteak tomatoes will take much longer to dry because they have more water content than plum tomatoes.

And speaking of beefsteak tomatoes, our next door neighbour gave us 3 beautiful beefsteak tomatoes from her sunny garden. They were wonderful!!

Oh dear... I really can't chop down our trees, but I've got to think of some way to get sun so we can grow tomatoes in our garden so that we will have an embarrassment of tomatoes as well.
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rooftop garden? magic with fibre optics?

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by blm on Sep 4, 04 - 10:20 PM

llizard, perhaps you could get a rooftop garden, either on your house or your garage.

Or ... shouldn't it be possible to funnel the sunlight from the roof or treetops down to the garden via fibre optics?
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Re: rooftop garden? magic with fibre optics?

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by llizard on Sep 5, 04 - 10:49 AM

blm wrote:
.....................................
: perhaps you could get a rooftop garden, either on your house or your garage
:................................................

We do have a second floor deck that used to be sunny but the backgarden treed area is now shading it for most of the day as well.

I'm not sure that the rooftops of the garage or house would be viable - we need some way of getting up there that isn't a rickety ladder. But if we're going to go to the trouble of building something on the house or the garage, perhaps we could change our minds and build a treehouse that had a spiral staircase to the sunny area above the trees.
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Re: Mayonnaise and Tomato Pie

Post by bravenet_archive »

originally posted by J Michael on Aug 31, 04 - 10:56 PM

Had been reading faithfully and with delight at the sight of fresh 25 tomatoes (and maybe more) ripening all at once, and after that 2 days ago, we were walking by "Litle India" to get ingredients for chicken curry and flour to make roti/naan, when my friend said she'd wanted to buy a bottle of mayonnaise, and quite cooly, mentioned that it could be made quite easily,as I had done so some time ago (and then thinking of llizard's forum friends), but never noticed the sugar, a welcome tip, MrsBrown but still have to wait till after Sept 12 to try noted version, for that matter anything that calls for eggs!! You are all much appreciated.
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